Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Ken Burns - Country Music

Collapse
X
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Ken Burns - Country Music

    Saw Ken Burns speak today at Tulane. I was already a fan but after hearing him speak so articulately and thoughtfully for an hour, I am even more impressed with the dude.

    He previewed his next series about Country Music, which is finished and which will air in the Fall, and it looks tremendous. He said he had just come from Nashville where there was a concert at the Ryman with a bunch of Nashville heavyweights to celebrate it and that was filmed and will be broadcast to celebrate the series, as well.


  • #2
    Nice. I always look forward to his docs. Seen most of them. Jazz and Civil War my favorites.

    Comment


    • #3
      The one on the Roosevelts and the ones on baseball and Jackie Robinson were great, as well. I thought the Jazz one coulda used one more episode, maybe using Miles' move toward rock/funk and the rise of fusion in the 70's as a focus. It seemed to give short shrift to the modern era.

      Ken was funny saying people invariably ask him things along the line of why this or that person wasn't included, etc., his thought being, "Jesus, I just made an 8 hour series and you are gonna question who isn't there?" Glad I didn't raise my hand and ask my question!

      He was so articulate and his explanations about his process were fascinating.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by chopitulas View Post
        The one on the Roosevelts and the ones on baseball and Jackie Robinson were great, as well. I thought the Jazz one coulda used one more episode, maybe using Miles' move toward rock/funk and the rise of fusion in the 70's as a focus. It seemed to give short shrift to the modern era.

        Ken was funny saying people invariably ask him things along the line of why this or that person wasn't included, etc., his thought being, "Jesus, I just made an 8 hour series and you are gonna question who isn't there?" Glad I didn't raise my hand and ask my question!

        He was so articulate and his explanations about his process were fascinating.
        Agreed, he should have spent more time on the fusion era. The last important chapter imo, before it went back to more traditional forms.

        When I was in high school, we worshiped Miles, Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Jean Luc Ponty, Al Dimeola, Pat Metheny, Jaco, Return to Forever. Those guys were my gateway drug to the Grateful Dead.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by Marignygregg View Post

          Agreed, he should have spent more time on the fusion era. The last important chapter imo, before it went back to more traditional forms.

          When I was in high school, we worshiped Miles, Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Jean Luc Ponty, Al Dimeola, Pat Metheny, Jaco, Return to Forever. Those guys were my gateway drug to the Grateful Dead.
          Right on.

          Did we go to the same high school? Dang...other friends brought the Zep/Allmans to the party, but those were the jazz artists for sure.

          One of the three musical highlights of November 2016, my month in the small town of Portrush, Northern Ireland, was attending a BBC Ulster radio host's 2 hour presentation on American Outlaw Country. He had a ton of videos, interviews, from Merle to Townes to Guy, Waylon, Willie, etc etc. Really well produced, and seeing one of our organic songstyles presented from another country's perspective was super fun.

          Comment


          • #6
            [QUOTE=Tye 1on;n834726]

            Right on.

            Did we go to the same high school? Dang...other friends brought the Zep/Allmans to the party, but those were the jazz artists for sure.

            Libertyville High School, outside Chicago. Other attendees include Tom Morello from Rage Against the Machine ( his mom taught there ) and Marlin Brando.

            Comment


            • #7
              This is two minutes of the seven minute trailer he showed yesterday:

              https://www.pbs.org/video/extended-t...upIpiiVxSnQ2DE

              Comment


              • #8
                [QUOTE=Marignygregg;n834727]
                Originally posted by Tye 1on View Post

                Libertyville High School, outside Chicago. Other attendees include Tom Morello from Rage Against the Machine ( his mom taught there ) and Marlin Brando.
                Nice! Midland High in central Michigan and then the newer Dow High produced founders of Sonic Youth and Sawyer Brown, and others. I'm somewhat doubtful Sawyer Brown will make this documentary but look forward to checking it out.

                Comment


                • #9
                  This will be fabulous .Can't wait for this one to air.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Marignygregg View Post

                    Agreed, he should have spent more time on the fusion era. The last important chapter imo, before it went back to more traditional forms.

                    When I was in high school, we worshiped Miles, Weather Report, Mahavishnu Orchestra, Jean Luc Ponty, Al Dimeola, Pat Metheny, Jaco, Return to Forever. Those guys were my gateway drug to the Grateful Dead.
                    this is interesting to me, having come from sort of the same background...

                    while I had all those WR, electric Miles, RTF records as a high schooler, they sent me in the opposite direction from the Dead and the like-I went to Ornette, Coltrane, Dolphy, blues artists like Sonny Boy Williamson, Wolf, etc and then to classic country like the Louvin Brothers. I know I was 'too cool for school' in my tastes back then, shoot maybe now....but I swore off rock bands that I thought meandered and didn't have vocalists that could emote like Ira Louvin and Etta James. It took free tickets to see Bruce on the River tour to reawaken me to rock music. Now, I find most of those fusion records I liked as an 19 year old unlistenable now-mostly due to the synths that showed up far too often. i actually wrote a letter to Return to Forever's management as a disillusioned young adult and got back a (i thought, who knows for real..) note from Chick Corea defending the use of electronic keyboards as creative expression.

                    i deserved it.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Dr. A. View Post

                      this is interesting to me, having come from sort of the same background...

                      while I had all those WR, electric Miles, RTF records as a high schooler, they sent me in the opposite direction from the Dead and the like-I went to Ornette, Coltrane, Dolphy, blues artists like Sonny Boy Williamson, Wolf, etc and then to classic country like the Louvin Brothers. I know I was 'too cool for school' in my tastes back then, shoot maybe now....but I swore off rock bands that I thought meandered and didn't have vocalists that could emote like Ira Louvin and Etta James. It took free tickets to see Bruce on the River tour to reawaken me to rock music. Now, I find most of those fusion records I liked as an 19 year old unlistenable now-mostly due to the synths that showed up far too often. i actually wrote a letter to Return to Forever's management as a disillusioned young adult and got back a (i thought, who knows for real..) note from Chick Corea defending the use of electronic keyboards as creative expression.

                      i deserved it.
                      Interesting indeed. I love hearing peoples musical journeys.

                      I was heavy into Yes my freshman year high school in Charleston, SC. When I moved back to Illinois sophomore year, my new friends were heavy into fusion, so it was an easy progression. The Dead days started shortly thereafter, which led to lots of different genres. Blues, Bluegrass, Country, Modern Jazz and more, including much of my New Orleans favorites.

                      I agree about how some of that late 70's/early 80's stuff was over produced with cheezy keyboards. Al Di Meola and Jean Luc Ponty come to mind. Jaco was great till the end.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Hi jazz documentary was fantastic. I wonder how the country music one will be. Could it be so good that it turns me into a country music fan I wonder?

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X