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  • Apparently, according to what I've read, Jerry directed Vince rewarding which instrument he used. Jerry wouldn't let him play an organ

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    • Saw Hornsby with the Dead several times and his jamming with Jerry was always a treat. Didn't know until a recent post that Ian MacLagan had auditioned when Vince did also. "Mac" would have added a whole new dimension to the Dead - a superb talent, wit and quite a soulful rocker.....

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      • I may have mentioned my band opened for The Tubes at Winterland in 1975 so I was a big fan from early on. They were unsigned at the time, doing their amazing show all on their own dime with all that great material that became their debut album, and I don't think they ever were as good again. Vince was a big part of it and it was weird for me to see him with the Dead where he was an odd fit.

        Donna always said she couldn't hear herself and I don't remember her being all that bad when I saw the band live but, boy, does she not sound great on a lot of tapes.

        I really liked the band with Hornsby as he was on par musically with Garcia. The NYE 1990 show with Branford was unreal, Bruce, Jerry and Branford all close together basically chasing each other's tail all night, musicianship at a very high level. But in retrospect, the band probably would have been better off taking a break rather than carrying on as scheduled with Bruce. Eventually, Garcia's lethargy got to him and was a part of why he left.
        Last edited by chopitulas; 12-11-2020, 09:18 PM.

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        • Originally posted by FestJester View Post
          Saw Hornsby with the Dead several times and his jamming with Jerry was always a treat. Didn't know until a recent post that Ian MacLagan had auditioned when Vince did also. "Mac" would have added a whole new dimension to the Dead - a superb talent, wit and quite a soulful rocker.....
          Ian MacLagan > Vince by a mile.

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          • Originally posted by chopitulas View Post
            I may have mentioned my band opened for The Tubes at Winterland in 1975 so I was a big fan from early on. They were unsigned at the time, doing their amazing show all on their own dime with all that great material that became their debut album, and I don't think they ever were as good again. Vince was a big part of it and it was weird for me to see him with the Dead where he was an odd fit.

            Donna always said she couldn't hear herself and I don't remember her being all that bad when I saw the band live but, boy, does she not sound great on a lot of tapes.

            I really liked the band with Hornsby as he was on par musically with Garcia. The NYE 1990 show with Branford was unreal, Bruce, Jerry and Branford all close together basically chasing each other's tail all night, musicianship at a very high level. But in retrospect, the band probably would have been better off taking a break rather than carrying on as scheduled with Bruce. Eventually, Garcia's lethargy got to him and was a part of why he left.
            Donna was great all of the times I saw them with her 76-78 including that famous Englishtown, NJ show. Only saw them once after that when they had Vince & Bruce in 92?

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            • Originally posted by marignygreg View Post
              The last Grateful Dead Album.

              I always thought that by 93-94 the band had enough new material to put out a quality album. What a shame that last lineup with Vince ( and Bruce ) never put out one last project. Maybe they could compile a collection of live versions and whatever they have from the studio ( I heard somewhere that they tried to cut a few of the songs ) ?

              Obvious title: Dead Last.

              Liberty
              Corrina
              Wave To The Wind
              Long Way To Go Home
              So Many Roads
              Eternity
              If The Shoe Fits
              Childhoods End
              The Days Between
              Easy Answers
              Samba In The Rain
              Lazy River Road


              I need closure !!
              You do know about "Ready Or Not" from last year which were live versions of 9 of those songs.

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              • Originally posted by jjazznj View Post

                You do know about "Ready Or Not" from last year which were live versions of 9 of those songs.
                Except the Phil tunes, which were pretty weak or underdeveloped anyways. I actually really liked that way more than I thought I would. Nicely recorded versions.

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                • I was listening to a couple of shows from 1991 from this great sounding "Giants Stadium 1987, 1989, 1991 Box Set". Vince really did use some cheesy sounding keyboards although Bruce's piano sounds good. I miss hearing an organ. Overall they do not sound like the band I loved from back in the 70s. Jerry and especially Bob did not sing as well as when they were younger and they seemed like more of a professional band which for these ears was not a good thing. During a couple of songs they did not even sound like The Dead to me. No big deal, I just prefer The Dead from the 70s.

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                  • Originally posted by jjazznj View Post
                    I just prefer The Dead from the 70s.
                    I think it would be rare to find a Deadhead who didn’t share that preference.

                    No one is claiming that the band was better in the 80s or 90s; but for many of us they remained worth seeing.

                    I always liked David Gans’s take in the essay where he compares Dead shows to baseball games (which I also love):

                    Grateful Dead concerts are like baseball games: no two are ever alike. The plays are always different, and there's always fresh hope. Sometimes the game's an all-timer even though individual performances are sloppy; sometimes everybody plays great but the team loses anyway.

                    Some people thrive on yesterday's moments, and aren't too keen on the way the game's played today. Some have only been fans since last year and don't care what happened way back when. You can cherish the great victories and triumphant seasons and chart them across decades, or you can go simply for the enjoyment of tonight and to hell with the standings. Like all the great teams, the Dead have their pennant years and bleak innings, perfect games and whippings, hits and foul balls, heroes and goats.

                    To many they're an institution, to some mere child's play, and to others the Grateful Dead is more or less an indispensable part of life. There are those who say the game's too slow, that the brief moments of action and excitement are too few and far between. Like "America's Favorite Pastime," the Dead are both celebrated and criticized, and some people will never see what's to enjoy.

                    Like big-league fans, Deadheads are as varied as the game is long. There are scorekeepers who record every detail for statistical analysis and a place in the Hall of Fame; camera buffs and video freaks; armchair umpires, die-hards, groupies. Some are bleacher bums who'd be in the stands no matter who was playing; and there are even spousal fans who go because if they didn't, they'd be left home alone. A lot of people attend because they've always gone and really don't care to stop.

                    It may take a few visits to grasp the subtleties, but if you let yourself into the flow of things, there's something to enjoy from the very first moment you're there. As the old saying goes, the mind believes what the mind believes: Grateful Dead is cerebral if you choose to analyze it, but it's basic and instinctive too. Like the game of baseball.





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                    • That was fun Lit. Nice post. Nice writing by the author. It had my mind wandering around. I was thinking of things, events and experiences that I don't often think about so much any longer. The baseball analogy was quite apt. Often times when games become boring or perhaps it was just me that is bored I will get up from my seat and wander around the concourse. Same with Dead concerts, if I needed a break i would go up to the concourse and be amused by the "twirlers".

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                      • What frustrated me after Hornsby left was the continued acceptance of the clearly weakening musical product. I was lucky enough to have seen the band in the Bay Area from 1967 on so I saw the halcyon days at a level not many were able to experience so there is that. When you were lucky enough to have been at Fillmore West during the "Live Dead" run, you have a high bar to measure against.

                        It was clear to me Garcia was in decline and the band was sinking with him, shorter sets, less adventure in the jams, a lethargy overall, but people still acted like things were fine. Just my take, of course, but I found it disturbing and sad to witness. It still is hard to see the shape Jerry was in on that last tour and not feel heartbroken. He was such a vital presence in the Bay Area when I grew up, someone for whom music was most important, and it sucked to realize he was in a place where he cared more about heroin than he did about music. (I used to usher JGB shows at the Warfield and it got to the point where the break was longer than the sets...).

                        But, hey, he left us TONS of great music to listen to, that's for sure! The good days do outnumber the bad.
                        Last edited by chopitulas; 12-12-2020, 02:51 PM.

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                        • Originally posted by chopitulas View Post
                          I used to usher JGB shows at the Warfield
                          So did I when I lived in San Francisco, from September 1989 to May 1990. Were you there then?

                          That was the best gig ever: free shows and two free drink tickets!

                          Saw a bunch of other shows too during that stint. I put in to work for pretty much every show I wanted to see. Love that room.

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                          • Originally posted by chopitulas View Post
                            What frustrated me after Hornsby left was the continued acceptance of the clearly weakening musical product. I was lucky enough to have seen the band in the Bay Area from 1967 on so I saw the halcyon days at a level not many were able to experience so there is that. When you were lucky enough to have been at Fillmore West during the "Live Dead" run, you have a high bar to measure against.

                            It was clear to me Garcia was in decline and the band was sinking with him, shorter sets, less adventure in the jams, a lethargy overall, but people still acted like things were fine. Just my take, of course, but I found it disturbing and sad to witness. It still is hard to see the shape Jerry was in on that last tour and not feel heartbroken. He was such a vital presence in the Bay Area when I grew up, someone for whom music was most important, and it sucked to realize he was in a place where he cared more about heroin than he did about music. (I used to usher JGB shows at the Warfield and it got to the point where the break was longer than the sets...).

                            But, hey, he left us TONS of great music to listen to, that's for sure! The good days do outnumber the bad.
                            Well like I said I saw them with Hornsby and although they were good I had no real desire to see them again. They were so different than the band I grew up with. Anything I heard after Hornsby left was really substandard.

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                            • "Originally posted by Lit View Post
                              So did I when I lived in San Francisco, from September 1989 to May 1990. Were you there then?

                              That was the best gig ever: free shows and two free drink tickets!

                              Saw a bunch of other shows too during that stint. I put in to work for pretty much every show I wanted to see. Love that room."


                              I did a lot of them, too, I think in that time frame. I know by the early 90's, I was doing it and I worked the Counting Crows, Richard Thompson, Jackson Browne, John Hiatt, Toad The Wet Sprocket off the top of my head. We probably worked some together! It was a fun gig. I usually got lucky on my assignment and never had to work too hard. There was one spot where you stood in the little box in the balcony between the loge and the upper seats dead center that they wanted blocked and that was the perfect spot. You did nothing and had a perfect view of the band.

                              I also ushered several shows outdoors at the Coliseum for the Rolling Stones and Pink Floyd. That was great, too, getting free access to the playing field. We had to wear a jacket and a white shirt and tie and at the Pink Floyd "Division Bell" show, a gal came up to me and my buddy and asked, "Do you travel with the band?" Yeah, right...we are Pink Floyd's highly trained personal ushering krewe... Saw the Stones soundcheck "Wild Horses" in street clothes with only us ushers in the house one time, as well.

                              By 2000, right before I moved to NOLA, I had enough seniority to get to usher for a Los Lobos show with the WIld Magnolias at the Fillmore, where they only needed a few people. My gig there was to stand in front of the soundboard and I got a free show, a poster and a soundboard recording from a guy I talked to who had been given access by the band. That was a sweet one!

                              The Warfield is a great room where I saw so many great shows going back to Dylan's first Gospel shows in 1979. Speaking of the Dead, I saw one of the great post-Jerry shows when Page and Trey from Phish joined Phil and Kimock in April 1999. And while evacuated back to CA, in 2007 I saw Phil re-create "Aoxomoxoa" and "Live Dead" with Jackie Greene and Larry Campbell.

                              Up until about 1985, the floor was all seats and I liked it better in that configuration as the sight lines from the vaudeville days were great in every seat. The seats got ripped out in some aborted attempt to turn it into a "disco" in about 1985. That lasted about a month before Bill Graham Presents got a hold of it again.

                              Bill Graham and BGP were truly a big part of my life from my first show at Winterland in 1967 til I left the Bay Area and, to my amazement, I actually got to play for him at Winterland in 1975. I can't thank the man enough for what he brought to my life.
                              Last edited by chopitulas; 12-12-2020, 04:15 PM.

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                              • Originally posted by jjazznj View Post

                                Well like I said I saw them with Hornsby and although they were good I had no real desire to see them again. They were so different than the band I grew up with. Anything I heard after Hornsby left was really substandard.
                                I thought 93 was a strong year. The last one, unfortunately. I felt the Spring 94 shows in Chicago ( Rosemont Horizon ) were pretty tight. Saw my last show at Deer Creek, Summer 94 and they were awful.

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