Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Starting a Festival...is this good advice, bad advice or some other type of advice?

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Starting a Festival...is this good advice, bad advice or some other type of advice?

    Here we summed up the 15 points of the guide.

    15 Steps to Starting a Local Music Festival (in a bad economy)

    Form a small, strong, determined committee who want to see local music get the attention and respect it deserves.
    Become a non-profit.
    Organize small fund raisers leading up to the big day.
    Create some buzz.
    Organize regular events at local music venues.
    Organize a Kickstarter campaign.
    Ask a local music retailer to donate back line drums and amps for use during the festival in exchange for a prime sponsorship of the festival.
    Keep the production costs low.”We paid $6,000 to rent the stages and sound equipment (and they were also one of our sponsors). The sound crew donated their time. Other fixed costs included electric generator ($900), Porta-Johns ($500 for three), police detail ($800), tents and tables ($600), bike racks ($150), backstage food ($250), posters and banners ($1,200), permits ($200), city inspectors ($500), insurance ($500), and on site electrician ($400). We also spent $3,000 on items to help manage and market our fund raisers. The whole festival’s budget was under $15,000.”
    Ask musicians and performers to play for free to help get the festival off the ground.
    Find an outdoor space that you can utilize for free.
    Seek sponsor dollars from local restaurants, cafes, retailers, education outlets, etc.
    Do strategic, inexpensive marketing.
    Keep it free.
    Have food available on-site for sale.
    Document the event.

    MORE AT LINK: http://blog.soundaymusic.com/do-it-y...mber_220610542

  • #2
    If you're interested in thsi topic, here's some video from the 2011 Sync Up conference with some advice and experiences.



    Panel Discussion: Curating a Music Festival
    Many of the big music festivals are setting new records – but others are coming online only to disappear within a year or so. Meanwhile, some festivals thrive by staying purposefully small.
    Moderator: Hugh Southard, President, Blue Mountain Artists (Charlotte, NC)
    Danny Melnick, President, Absolutely Live (New York, NY)
    Rob Gibson, Artistic Director, Savannah Music Festival (Savannah, GA)
    Bruce Labadie, Festival Director, San Jose Jazz Festival (San Jose, CA)
    Michael Arnone, Producer/Creator, Michael Arnone’s Crawfish Fest (Augusta, NJ)
    Jennifer Pickering, Executive Director, LEAF (Lake Eden Arts Festival) (Asheville, NC)
    Mel Puljic, Principal, Mondo Mundo (New York, NY)

    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PSOwSt7UCdM
    Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      I don't know about the "keep it free" part.
      Friends of mine have done a very good job with their blues festival and they keep it simple. They have only 1 corporate sponsor and they are very hands-on. They do all of the artist bookings themselves, which has the perk of traveling to blues festivals to sign the performers.
      Kickstarter is a very cool thing!

      P.S.~ I would never dream of asking a performer to play for free. You get what you pay for, imo.

      Comment


      • #4
        Here is your formula....

        Comment


        • #5
          Ask musicians and performers to play for free to help get the festival off the ground.
          I really disagree with this one. It is not fair to musicians IMO.

          How would you feel if your employer asked you to work for free this week?

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by saturn View Post
            I really disagree with this one. It is not fair to musicians IMO.

            How would you feel if your employer asked you to work for free this week?
            I agree with you saturn. When we started Wednesdays on the Point, we called in a lot of favors, but the artists were paid. An extra sponsor or two or three will cover that, and build goodwill with the performers.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by rosetree View Post
              I agree with you saturn. When we started Wednesdays on the Point, we called in a lot of favors, but the artists were paid. An extra sponsor or two or three will cover that, and build goodwill with the performers.
              I AGREE. IF YOU ARE A NON PROFIT YOU MIGHT EB ABLE TO DO A FREE EVENT AND EVERY BAND GETS PAID. THAT IS ALL ABOUT THE BEER AND ALL THAT THOUGH. Seems like a lot of festivals though have good sponsorships and still fail. Blues festivals are not making it anywhere now, not even free ones. I think you have to have other things, be more interactive myself. Something they can't get anywhere else. Something that is an adjunct to the music itself because no matter what type of festival you have, eventually you are going to have to book the same bands over again.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by bennyboy View Post
                I AGREE. IF YOU ARE A NON PROFIT YOU MIGHT EB ABLE TO DO A FREE EVENT AND EVERY BAND GETS PAID. ...
                Just a heads up, becoming and maintaining a non profit is harder than you think. There are certain legal and tax requirements that have to be met to get started and then to keep your status.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by bennyboy View Post
                  I AGREE. IF YOU ARE A NON PROFIT YOU MIGHT EB ABLE TO DO A FREE EVENT AND EVERY BAND GETS PAID. THAT IS ALL ABOUT THE BEER AND ALL THAT THOUGH. Seems like a lot of festivals though have good sponsorships and still fail. Blues festivals are not making it anywhere now, not even free ones. I think you have to have other things, be more interactive myself. Something they can't get anywhere else. Something that is an adjunct to the music itself because no matter what type of festival you have, eventually you are going to have to book the same bands over again.
                  When I talk to the 20 & 30 sometings in my office about going to Festivals, 90% of the time their response involves how excited they were to see a web cast of a festival. "It was almost like being there". I am always amazed that their generation enjoys watching our generation actually attending events with very little desire to attend themselves. Now I know it's not everyone but I think it's enough to hurt festivals.

                  The more personally electronic we get, the less in-person social we get.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by festbabe View Post
                    Just a heads up, becoming and maintaining a non profit is harder than you think. There are certain legal and tax requirements that have to be met to get started and then to keep your status.

                    Much harder to be and maintain being a corporation however and I would not do a festival unless I was a corporation. I've been both (and will eventually restart one) and it is no comparison really as to which is easier to run....

                    Non profits are great because you get temp permits for booze etc. And they are easier to get sponsorships as well and donations...

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      You should do everything possible to have it in a place where you can control the liquor sales. Make sure you get a cut, a big cut. And if you serve multiple beers from ONE distributor, remember that they have LOTS of marketing money that they get from their brands that could be used for sponsorship. This should be the key in making your fest profitable (even a non-profit fest needs moneys for the following year), and allow you to pay the bands. You NEED to pay the bands because for the first year, they ARE the fest because they will be your best marketing tool (announcing from all their gigs to loyal fans that they will be there).

                      Should you feel the need to keep admission free, consider a paid VIP area! Your sponsors will appreciate their free admission to it, your bands will appreciate it, plus you can grab a little cash from your area's biggest music fans. Up close viewing, a tent, air conditioned portapotties and meet-and-greets with the artists doesn't cost a lot, but can help sell sponsorships in the future.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I have worked at many festivals over the years.

                        The most important thing is to make sure that you have enough of everything IE Toilets,Food stalls, Bars, Water Fountains, Showers, if its a campng fest and plenty of , Bloody Hot Water, toilet paper, soap on a rope etc.

                        People hate standing in a line for anything, especialy when they have paid good bucks to get in.

                        I know I certainly do as well.


                        You should also try to resist the temptation to stitch people up on the Food and Drink prices, as that can have a negative impact via word of mouth. At Byron Bay they rob you on the Grog, but get way with it thanks to the great line up, and the fact that everything else is pretty good, but I cant speak on camping stuff, but as they own the land it should be OK, but who knows.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Jeff (hubby) and his music business partner Shannon got an outdoor concert series going in Jackson Hole last summer (www.jacksonholelivemusic.com). They did a lot of these things (see below).

                          Here we summed up the 15 points of the guide.

                          15 Steps to Starting a Local Music Festival (in a bad economy)

                          Form a small, strong, determined committee who want to see local music get the attention and respect it deserves.
                          YES

                          Become a non-profit.
                          YES

                          Organize small fund raisers leading up to the big day.
                          SOME OF THIS, BUT YOU REALLY NEED SPONSORS

                          Create some buzz.
                          YES

                          Organize regular events at local music venues.
                          YES, BUT DON'T OVERDO IT AND DILUTE WHAT YOU'RE TRYING TO DO

                          Organize a Kickstarter campaign.
                          THEY DIDN'T DO THAT, BUT HAVE LOTS OF DONATION BUCKETS AT ALL THE EVENTS

                          Ask a local music retailer to donate back line drums and amps for use during the festival in exchange for a prime sponsorship of the festival.
                          ANYTHING YOU CAN GET DONATED IS GOOD

                          Keep the production costs low.”We paid $6,000 to rent the stages and sound equipment (and they were also one of our sponsors). The sound crew donated their time. Other fixed costs included electric generator ($900), Porta-Johns ($500 for three), police detail ($800), tents and tables ($600), bike racks ($150), backstage food ($250), posters and banners ($1,200), permits ($200), city inspectors ($500), insurance ($500), and on site electrician ($400). We also spent $3,000 on items to help manage and market our fund raisers. The whole festival’s budget was under $15,000.”
                          ALL TRUE

                          Ask musicians and performers to play for free to help get the festival off the ground.
                          I WOULD ALSO SAY NO, BUT LOOK FOR UP AND COMING BANDS IN THE PRICE RANGE YOU CAN AFFORD.

                          Find an outdoor space that you can utilize for free.
                          DEFINITELY

                          Seek sponsor dollars from local restaurants, cafes, retailers, education outlets, etc.
                          YES YES YES

                          Do strategic, inexpensive marketing.
                          INCLUDE SOCIAL MEDIA

                          Keep it free.
                          YOU KNOW WHAT, JEFF HAS TRIED BOTH KINDS OF EVENTS AND FREE IS WHERE IT'S AT. YOU MAKE MONEY FROM SPONSORS, AND ON BEVERAGE AND FOOD SALES.

                          Have food available on-site for sale.
                          AND DRINKS!! MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A VARIETY OF BOTH

                          Document the event.
                          I SUPPOSE SO

                          MORE AT LINK: http://blog.soundaymusic.com/do-it-y...mber_220610542
                          Last edited by Amy Winette; 03-10-2013, 12:14 AM.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Amy Winette View Post
                            Jeff (hubby) and his music business partner Shannon got an outdoor concert series going in Jackson Hole last summer (www.jacksonholelivemusic.com). They did a lot of these things (see below).

                            Here we summed up the 15 points of the guide.

                            15 Steps to Starting a Local Music Festival (in a bad economy)

                            Form a small, strong, determined committee who want to see local music get the attention and respect it deserves.
                            YES

                            Become a non-profit.
                            YES

                            Organize small fund raisers leading up to the big day.
                            SOME OF THIS, BUT YOU REALLY NEED SPONSORS

                            Create some buzz.
                            YES

                            Organize regular events at local music venues.
                            YES, BUT DON'T OVERDO IT AND DILUTE WHAT YOU'RE TRYING TO DO

                            Organize a Kickstarter campaign.
                            THEY DIDN'T DO THAT, BUT HAVE LOTS OF DONATION BUCKETS AT ALL THE EVENTS

                            Ask a local music retailer to donate back line drums and amps for use during the festival in exchange for a prime sponsorship of the festival.
                            ANYTHING YOU CAN GET DONATED IS GOOD

                            Keep the production costs low.”We paid $6,000 to rent the stages and sound equipment (and they were also one of our sponsors). The sound crew donated their time. Other fixed costs included electric generator ($900), Porta-Johns ($500 for three), police detail ($800), tents and tables ($600), bike racks ($150), backstage food ($250), posters and banners ($1,200), permits ($200), city inspectors ($500), insurance ($500), and on site electrician ($400). We also spent $3,000 on items to help manage and market our fund raisers. The whole festival’s budget was under $15,000.”
                            ALL TRUE

                            Ask musicians and performers to play for free to help get the festival off the ground.
                            I WOULD ALSO SAY NO, BUT LOOK FOR UP AND COMING BANDS IN THE PRICE RANGE YOU CAN AFFORD.

                            Find an outdoor space that you can utilize for free.
                            DEFINITELY

                            Seek sponsor dollars from local restaurants, cafes, retailers, education outlets, etc.
                            YES YES YES

                            Do strategic, inexpensive marketing.
                            INCLUDE SOCIAL MEDIA

                            Keep it free.
                            YOU KNOW WHAT, JEFF HAS TRIED BOTH KINDS OF EVENTS AND FREE IS WHERE IT'S AT. YOU MAKE MONEY FROM SPONSORS, AND ON BEVERAGE AND FOOD SALES.

                            Have food available on-site for sale.
                            AND DRINKS!! MAKE SURE YOU HAVE A VARIETY OF BOTH

                            Document the event.
                            I SUPPOSE SO

                            MORE AT LINK: http://blog.soundaymusic.com/do-it-y...mber_220610542
                            Awesome thanks for the input. This is not for me, but the question comes up all the time so I thought I'd put some info out there and see some other opinions about it. thanks to all. keep em coming.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              i would think you need to start with a business plan.
                              what is your product, who is your target market? how many people do you need to show up and what is the average they will spend?

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X