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Reaching out to all you COOKS for suggestions....

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  • #31
    Originally posted by windowman View Post
    Ms. windowman is a wonderful cook, as one can plainly see by one look at yours truly. I will say that everything she cooks in her cast iron skillet is more flavorful than when using Revere or Corning pots and pans. An added benefit is that you will get some of the iron in your diet and likely can eliminate taking iron supplements. Lodge has a large variety of skillets and dutch ovens, some of which are now enameled to make them more decorative. Cast iron cookware needs to be seasoned and requires a little more care, but if I could take only one item from our kitchen and lose the rest, it would be the iron skillet.
    Thanks Wynn- yes Lori is a very good cook.. can't do cast iron- someone we know has 'forgotten' about the care of cast iron and messed up a bit.. miss it- but not enough to replace it for now.. and large dutch ovens- we have a big lobster/gumbo pot- don't really have room for 2
    hope you guys are good and thanks much.

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    • #32
      Originally posted by Chas_P View Post
      I will second the cast iron skillet. It is a must. I find it easy to care for, just don't use soap to clean it. I also have a cast iron wok which was another great investment. I heat it in the oven before I use it so that it's evenly heated for stir frying.
      YYR.. but you have to respect the care of it......... if not- then it gets ruined...

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      • #33
        Originally posted by glinda View Post
        Just to add to that.... After reading about the bad feng shui of having knives openly hanging on the wall - such as on a magnetic holder - I can no longer do that, either. It cuts the chi (energy flow). Bad energy. In the kitchen, a place where your prosperity energy is supposed to grow.
        wow- never knew that- but I get it...thanks much

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        • #34
          Originally posted by SweetOlive View Post
          I love my Cutco knives. They are guaranteed for life and you can send them back any time, as often as you want for sharpening. I mainly use the same 2 knives and it's been at least 5 years since I've had them sharpened and I won't be sending them in any time soon. I hate sharpening knives myself, and I simply don't do it. Most of their knives you can't sharpen yourself, but that works out for me. And they have a full tang.
          again, never heard of cutco...thanks

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          • #35
            Originally posted by Nancy10016 View Post
            YYR.. but you have to respect the care of it......... if not- then it gets ruined...
            But it can be un-ruined too! Use steel wool or a Brillo pad to get the rust and/or gunk off (I use oven cleaner on the outside and bottom of mine) then a little hot water and kosher salt and scrub it good. Now comes the fun part....fry up some bacon! Leave the bacon grease in the pan and put it in a warm oven for a while, swirling the grease up on the sides occasionally. Turn the oven off, let the pan cool, pour out the remaining grease and wipe with a paper towel. Presto! Just like new cast iron.

            I buy a lot of old cast iron at garage sales and estate sales to use for rust-dying fabric in and I go for the oldest, rustiest stuff I can find. I have un-ruined some really pitiful examples of neglected cast iron to use for cooking too. I have a big dutch oven with a lid that was barely recognizable as cast iron when I found it in a barn and it is now one of my most-used pots in the kitchen.

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            • #36
              Originally posted by Delta View Post
              But it can be un-ruined too! Use steel wool or a Brillo pad to get the rust and/or gunk off (I use oven cleaner on the outside and bottom of mine) then a little hot water and kosher salt and scrub it good. Now comes the fun part....fry up some bacon! Leave the bacon grease in the pan and put it in a warm oven for a while, swirling the grease up on the sides occasionally. Turn the oven off, let the pan cool, pour out the remaining grease and wipe with a paper towel. Presto! Just like new cast iron.

              ..
              Thanks for this! One of mine needs to be re-seasoned. Will do this weekend when we need some bacon

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              • #37
                What an informative thread. Great "off-season" threadhead knowledge sharing!

                Damn, we're good.

                Thanks for asking the question, Nancy. And sorry you guys had to go through the awful experience that led to it...

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by festbabe View Post
                  Thanks for this! One of mine needs to be re-seasoned. Will do this weekend when we need some bacon
                  Mine doesn't need re-seasoning, but I'm going to say it does so I can buy bacon!!

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                  • #39
                    We have Calaphon pots and pans and they are fine, but I never use them once I got a large Lodge cast iron (although my wife uses the calaphon a bit). Cast iron, cast iron, cast iron. So good and really so easy to care for once you know how and I don't scratch the finish, can use metal etc... so it is easier for me.

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                    • #40
                      Originally posted by Nancy10016 View Post
                      YYR.. but you have to respect the care of it......... if not- then it gets ruined...
                      Originally posted by Delta View Post
                      But it can be un-ruined too! Use steel wool or a Brillo pad to get the rust and/or gunk off (I use oven cleaner on the outside and bottom of mine) then a little hot water and kosher salt and scrub it good. Now comes the fun part....fry up some bacon! Leave the bacon grease in the pan and put it in a warm oven for a while, swirling the grease up on the sides occasionally. Turn the oven off, let the pan cool, pour out the remaining grease and wipe with a paper towel. Presto! Just like new cast iron.

                      I buy a lot of old cast iron at garage sales and estate sales to use for rust-dying fabric in and I go for the oldest, rustiest stuff I can find. I have un-ruined some really pitiful examples of neglected cast iron to use for cooking too. I have a big dutch oven with a lid that was barely recognizable as cast iron when I found it in a barn and it is now one of my most-used pots in the kitchen.
                      I was gonna say you can get the best cast iron at garage/yard sales, clean them up and re-season 'em for little of nothing.

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                      • #41
                        My go to pot is a Le Creuset dutch oven. It is enameled cast iron so you get all the benefits of cast iron without the upkeep. It goes from stove to oven, cleans up easily and because of the enamel you can cook acidic foods that might react with cast iron or aluminum. It's not cheap but it will last a lifetime.

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                        • #42
                          [QUOTE=Delta;503403]But it can be un-ruined too! Use steel wool or a Brillo pad to get the rust and/or gunk off (I use oven cleaner on the outside and bottom of mine) then a little hot water and kosher salt and scrub it good. Now comes the fun part....fry up some bacon! Leave the bacon grease in the pan and put it in a warm oven for a while, swirling the grease up on the sides occasionally. Turn the oven off, let the pan cool, pour out the remaining grease and wipe with a paper towel. Presto! Just like new cast iron.QUOTE]

                          And more great information, love learning all these new tips!... thanks Delta!

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                          • #43
                            Originally posted by glinda View Post
                            What an informative thread. Great "off-season" threadhead knowledge sharing!

                            Damn, we're good.

                            Thanks for asking the question, Nancy. And sorry you guys had to go through the awful experience that led to it...
                            YYR, but look at all the great new things we've all learned from it... lots of talent out there!

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                            • #44
                              Originally posted by CEfromLA View Post
                              Mine doesn't need re-seasoning, but I'm going to say it does so I can buy bacon!!
                              now really - do you need a reason to buy bacon??

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                              • #45
                                I definitely think I see a new Le Creuset or cast iron pan in our future...
                                thank you all for the suggestions and great information.. I knew you all would steer us the right way!! And thanks for all the love during the whole thing...

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