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JF Rentals - what did I miss?

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  • JF Rentals - what did I miss?

    I started looking around recently for two week rentals for 2019, and was a little taken aback at both the rates and the lack of availability. I have rented several times in the past, and, while never exactly cheap, I understood that there was going to be a premium to pay. I had to miss this past year, and have been out of the loop. Did the city decide to crack down on airbnb type rentals? Understandable, I guess if they did. In others' experience have they gotten more expensive and harder to find?
    Last edited by resmp; 08-04-2018, 05:37 PM.

  • #2
    There has been a big crackdown on Airbnb and their ilk.

    I an too dumb to post links but there is lots of info out there on this.

    I don't know about rentals but I do know that lots of folks have scored some good hotel deals for next year a little while back.

    You can check out Swags site for details on that.

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    • #3
      Thanks Gards. Suspected as much. Always had mixed feelings about the short term rentals, but it was great to have a place to hang out that wasn’t a hotel room.

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      • #4
        The city started licensing short term rentals a year ago. The only area with an outright ban is the French Quarter (except part of Bourbon). In the rest of the city, there are 2 types of licenses. "Accessory" licenses are theoretically spare rooms, but in NOLA are usually half of an owner-occupied double. These licenses allow year round rental but require a homestead exemption. "Temporary" licenses allow whole home rentals, allowing up to 90 days a year. These are envisioned as folks renting out their home while they vacation elsewhere, but in NOLA are often out of town investors who own many properties just for short term rentals. Anyway, several weeks ago, the city issued a moritorium on new "temporary" licenses and on renewals while they "look into" the issue more. So that may have cut the available supply some, though I'm sure many will continue to rent without licenses.
        Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

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        • #5
          The crackdowns on short term rentals in certain US cities is odd to me. We've used Airbnb, or its predecessor VRBO, all over the world. I have fond memories of a private apartment in Salzburg, a large, shared apartment in Vienna, a guest room in Munich. We had a lovely walkup in Venice, Italy. There were apartments on different weeks in two different neighborhoods in Mexico City. I could go on and on.

          Why is this something that needs to be restricted in New Orleans??

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          • #6
            It all sounds so cute and quaint........until.........you’re trying to sleep....:..and there’s a party next door until 3 am.....every night......because they’re from out of town.....on vacation......and here to have FUN!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by cp_deb View Post
              The crackdowns on short term rentals in certain US cities is odd to me. We've used Airbnb, or its predecessor VRBO, all over the world. I have fond memories of a private apartment in Salzburg, a large, shared apartment in Vienna, a guest room in Munich. We had a lovely walkup in Venice, Italy. There were apartments on different weeks in two different neighborhoods in Mexico City. I could go on and on.

              Why is this something that needs to be restricted in New Orleans??
              From what I hear from locals, airbnb is so rampant that there are not enough places to rent for those who make New Orleans their home.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by 20-20 View Post
                It all sounds so cute and quaint........until.........you’re trying to sleep....:..and there’s a party next door until 3 am.....every night......because they’re from out of town.....on vacation......and here to have FUN!
                I rented a duplex back in the day where the other side was occupied by tweekers. Partying every night until 3 am was de riguer. So were the screaming arguments the couple got in when dude wouldn't get up for work at 5 am. The behavior of these neighbors was not closely related to the fact that they were renters.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by cp_deb View Post

                  I rented a duplex back in the day where the other side was occupied by tweekers. Partying every night until 3 am was de riguer. So were the screaming arguments the couple got in when dude wouldn't get up for work at 5 am. The behavior of these neighbors was not closely related to the fact that they were renters.
                  Birds of a feather stick together. Most likely just copying your behaviors.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 20-20 View Post

                    Birds of a feather stick together. Most likely just copying your behaviors.
                    LOL you obviously don't know me very well. My nickname since high school has been "cocoon lady." Late night anything has never been for me.

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                    • #11
                      One of the bigger problems I've heard from people I know who live in the Bywater is the effect on local businesses. The properties are not occupied full-time and therefore the local businesses take a direct hit whereas if those same properties were occupied by full-time tenants then the local businesses(restaurants, bars, hardware stores, etc.) would be receiving business on a more daily basis.

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                      • #12
                        Obviously, a complex socio-economic situation such as this is extremely nuanced, multifaceted and is comprised of many different competing and interconnected concepts, but I am sure that we, as a group of people who love New Orleans and the good people thereof, can all come together and say that in a nutshell, it is clearly all white people's fault...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MormonMatthew View Post
                          Obviously, a complex socio-economic situation such as this is extremely nuanced, multifaceted and is comprised of many different competing and interconnected concepts, but I am sure that we, as a group of people who love New Orleans and the good people thereof, can all come together and say that in a nutshell, it is clearly all white people's fault...
                          You should stick to posting about your beloved Grateful Dead..

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Jim View Post
                            One of the bigger problems I've heard from people I know who live in the Bywater is the effect on local businesses. The properties are not occupied full-time and therefore the local businesses take a direct hit whereas if those same properties were occupied by full-time tenants then the local businesses(restaurants, bars, hardware stores, etc.) would be receiving business on a more daily basis.
                            So, basically, business income in a town that thrives on tourism can be somewhat seasonal. Got it.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by cp_deb View Post

                              So, basically, business income in a town that thrives on tourism can be somewhat seasonal. Got it.
                              Not every neighborhood in New Orleans thrives on tourism.

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