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Robert Frank, RIP

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  • Robert Frank, RIP

    Kinda surprised there's nothing on him. Figured plenty of Stones fan had seen Cocksucker Blues, not to mention the cover of Exile, or "Trolley--New Orleans" his landmark photo.



    Robert Frank’s “Trolley—New Orleans”, a jewel-like multi-portrait photograph showing a row of passengers segregated by color, age and sex in a trolley car on Bourbon Street....

    Taken in 1955, the same year Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man at the front of the bus in Montgomery, Alabama, the straight-ahead gaze of Frank’s camera captures the flip side of the American dream in the 1950s South. Transcending the distinction between media image and aesthetic object – between art and photojournalism – to make from a single pregnant moment a complete and enduring image – Frank’s superbly layered photograph is a stand-in for what many believe to be his life’s crowning achievement.

    ....
    “Trolley—New Orleans”, a photograph that follows in the tradition of Lewis Hine and Jacob Riis, served Frank as an important avenue for expressing himself politically. The policy of compelling racial groups to live apart from each other – going to separate schools, the use of separate social facilities, etc., was perfectly captured symbolically by Frank’s sharp lens as he walked up to that trolley and pointed his Leica at this perfect site of institutionalized Southern racism.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Quint View Post
    Kinda surprised there's nothing on him. Figured plenty of Stones fan had seen Cocksucker Blues, not to mention the cover of Exile, or "Trolley--New Orleans" his landmark photo.



    Robert Frank’s “Trolley—New Orleans”, a jewel-like multi-portrait photograph showing a row of passengers segregated by color, age and sex in a trolley car on Bourbon Street....

    Taken in 1955, the same year Rosa Parks refused to give up her seat to a white man at the front of the bus in Montgomery, Alabama, the straight-ahead gaze of Frank’s camera captures the flip side of the American dream in the 1950s South. Transcending the distinction between media image and aesthetic object – between art and photojournalism – to make from a single pregnant moment a complete and enduring image – Frank’s superbly layered photograph is a stand-in for what many believe to be his life’s crowning achievement.

    ....
    “Trolley—New Orleans”, a photograph that follows in the tradition of Lewis Hine and Jacob Riis, served Frank as an important avenue for expressing himself politically. The policy of compelling racial groups to live apart from each other – going to separate schools, the use of separate social facilities, etc., was perfectly captured symbolically by Frank’s sharp lens as he walked up to that trolley and pointed his Leica at this perfect site of institutionalized Southern racism.
    I have never seen the film, just read about it. The Stones kind of disowned it. I did admire Frank's photography, though.

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