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  • Future of music festivals

    How do you think all this will impact future festivals? Things will obviously have to change with large events.

  • #2
    If there is a vaccine found for this virus, and/or it plays itself out as most such things have done in the past, things will go back to the way that they were, and this will fade into collective memory. In the immediate future, I don't know and neither does anybody else except possibly the president who seems to know everything.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Kemp View Post
      If there is a vaccine found for this virus, and/or it plays itself out as most such things have done in the past, things will go back to the way that they were, and this will fade into collective memory. In the immediate future, I don't know and neither does anybody else except possibly the president who seems to know everything.
      Tug's is now the President?

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Kemp View Post
        If there is a vaccine found for this virus, and/or it plays itself out as most such things have done in the past, things will go back to the way that they were, and this will fade into collective memory. In the immediate future, I don't know and neither does anybody else except possibly the president who seems to know everything.
        The first big festival is going to be called Trump Fest, and will be held sometime this summer. It will feature "stars" like Ted Nugent, Kid Rock and Kanye West. It will be HUGE, even bigger than the crowd at his Inauguration.

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        • #5
          It's a great question. It's a given there won't be any this year, and, much as I hate to say it, I think 2021 is a fifty/fifty proposition at best unless we get really lucky and a treatment becomes widely available. (Vaccine by early next year is pretty unlikely). By 2022, if we've picked up some herd immunity (still uncertain) and/or there are vaccines/treatments in place, festivals may look no different than they did in 2019. I remember being at Fest during the Swine Flu, which of course was much less severe. But there was some concern given Louisiana's proximity to Texas and Mexico I remember a few nervous jokes, but ultimately it had no long term effect.

          But this is unlike anything we've seen. I dunno. What do the rest of you say?

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          • #6
            Instead of dividing Fest goers by class ( VIP packages ) we will divide by immune/not immune. The immune can gather like old times. the vulnerable will need more space so they can social distance. And no entry if you have a temperature or any symptoms.

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            • #7
              If JF 2021 can't happen 'live', how about pay-per-view with bands playing on an outdoor stage somewhere; it would be better than nothing. A new industry might arise: shipping JF fairgrounds food items to stay-at-home 'attendees'. Zoom gatherings for socializing and CFWing. Virtually anything is possible virtually, yes/no?

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              • #8
                Things will be normal sooner than the direst predictions suggest, but not as soon as we would like for them to be.

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                • #9
                  Even without efficacious treatment(s) and/or vaccine(s), music festivals as we know them will return in conducive locales. The thinking will be: risk of serious sequelae from exposure is at an acceptable level. The denominator will rise, the numerator will fall, indicative of a much lower mortality rate than currently thought. We’ll learn to embrace the basics taught in health class. These positive lifestyle behaviors boost immunity and lessen the chance of exposure to an overwhelming inoculum. The most vulnerable among us, if naive to the virus, will need to take additional precautions based on individual risk factors. Personal responsibility at festivals will minimize contagion: ie staying home if sick, covering up when sneezing/coughing, frequent hand cleansing, and maintaining an adequate distance from anyone who appears ill. Medical facilities/caregivers, institutionalized folks(ie prisons/military/assisted living) need maximum diligence given its virulence. There is no way to reduce your chance of contracting transmissible pathogens to zero unless you’re living in a bubble. They are everywhere, including OR's. Festing is good for your heart and soul. Embrace the communal FUNK!
                  Last edited by teetertotter; 04-26-2020, 04:29 PM.

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                  • #10
                    Festing in place is better than nothing; however in 2021, expect to be sauntering through Fairgrounds gate.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Kemp View Post
                      If there is a vaccine found for this virus, and/or it plays itself out as most such things have done in the past, things will go back to the way that they were, and this will fade into collective memory.
                      I'm ready to forget this as rapidly as possible.

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                      • #12
                        A couple of articles about live music, not necessarily festivals:

                        https://www.offbeat.com/news/how-do-...-music-venues/

                        https://www.rollingstone.com/music/m...-tours-980968/

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                        • #13
                          I heard this podcast on NPR about the extended damage to the larger festival families today. To say it was a bit depressing is an understatement, but the depth of the ruination that a year, or more, of sidelined music/theater/sports/convention could cause on the non-musical parts of music festivals is starting to dawn on me. I know a couple of staff with our local staging & productions union and they haven't worked a day and have no idea when they will get the call. Sure, there have been layoffs before: rehab - physical (injury) and the other rehab; change in address & lifestyle (family situation); taking a "straight" salaried job and being unwilling to go back to piece work. But, if the one-year mark is the breaking point for some merchandising folks on the festival circuit, how long after unemployment benefits run out will stage-craft staff be able to hold on without, as Phish (and other fest) merch seller Kim Warner opines in the podcast, embarking on Kim V3.0.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by duende View Post
                            I heard this podcast on NPR about the extended damage to the larger festival families today. To say it was a bit depressing is an understatement, but the depth of the ruination that a year, or more, of sidelined music/theater/sports/convention could cause on the non-musical parts of music festivals is starting to dawn on me. I know a couple of staff with our local staging & productions union and they haven't worked a day and have no idea when they will get the call. Sure, there have been layoffs before: rehab - physical (injury) and the other rehab; change in address & lifestyle (family situation); taking a "straight" salaried job and being unwilling to go back to piece work. But, if the one-year mark is the breaking point for some merchandising folks on the festival circuit, how long after unemployment benefits run out will stage-craft staff be able to hold on without, as Phish (and other fest) merch seller Kim Warner opines in the podcast, embarking on Kim V3.0.
                            I know where these people are coming from.

                            I have been involved with concert, event and sports merchandising since the early 80s and also with some event management stuff from time to time.
                            And in recent years when things have been very hard , due to company buyouts etc. I have just managed to survive by supplementing all the former contracting income with some semi permanent stuff helping run the Merch concession at our biggest sports venue here in town, the MCG that can hold 100,000 people.
                            Needless to say I have no idea when I am next working.

                            My friend and I are only make decent dough on the big events or concerts in recent times due to the hours involved and the fact that some firms will still pay half decent wages when they really need to have experienced people around. We were going to be involved in 4 big events that we knew of this year and they have all been cancelled. Plus we had been made aware of some planned stadium shows coming down in Oct, Nov and December all of which have been given the arse.

                            On the smaller things some firms use the younger less experienced staff, pay them less. And often only get the old stagers like us in, when the big crowds are there as they know that they must have us around when troubles arise, as they always seem to.

                            So many people are in deep shit. The music biz people I know are very worried and big sports as well The MCG gets about 50 or so games in football season, with an average crowd of about 50,000. We are half way through the season with no crowds yet, and this one stadium employs heaps of staff when you factor in front of house, catering, corporate services, security, merch, operations and facility stuff plus lots more.

                            I still know lots of people involved with the massive 2 week Australian Open Tennis and the fate of that is unknown at present. It is still 6 months away but our borders are closed for an undermined time. So who knows what will transpire?

                            Melbourne is a big music city and we fear that many music venues will not be reopening as they will not have the resources to pay the back rent owing. Once again there will be the flow on effect as lots of them are parts of old city Pubs, which are also going broke, and so it goes

                            Plenty of Krewe I know are trying to not let it get us down, but a lots of us are not spring chickens anymore and to say that we are not confident of having a good next year is an understatement .

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                            • #15
                              Damn, thinking good thoughts for you down under, Bryce. Your country has handled yourselves much better than, say, others - I hope you get the chance to reap the benefits in short order. We may be lagging behind on that score.

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