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Virtually Watch the Premiere of ‘Up from the Streets New Orleans: The City of Music’

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  • Virtually Watch the Premiere of ‘Up from the Streets New Orleans: The City of Music’

    On Friday, May 15, Eagle Rock Entertainment and Michael Murphy Productions will premiere a virtual cinema release of the celebrated New Orleans documentary “Up from The Streets : New Orleans: The City of Music.” In an effort to assist the musical artists of New Orleans, a portion of the proceeds from each $12 “ticket” sale will be donated to The New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Foundation’s Jazz & Heritage Music Relief Fund – a statewide relief initiative supporting Louisiana musicians who have lost income amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

    https://www.facebook.com/wwozneworle...type=3&theater

    https://wgno.com/news/virtually-watc...city-of-music/

    https://watch.eventive.org/upfromthe...b03b002b36c462
    Last edited by jjazznj; 2 weeks ago.

  • #2
    I thought the movie was very good - a broad look at New Orleans. Too much Keith Richards though, and instead could use more music.

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    • #3
      Absolutely worth the $12.
      We really enjoyed it!

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by husb_2ndliner View Post
        I thought the movie was very good - a broad look at New Orleans. Too much Keith Richards though, and instead could use more music.
        I thought they tried to cover a bit too much ground for under 2 hours and they kind of jumped all over the place. Lots of Harry Connick Jr and Terrance Blanchard who rarely ever play here or play New Orleans music. Plus some of the footage of bands playing was not their best like The Neville Brothers and The Radiators or Galactic where they kept showing Skerik who is not even in the band. I'm sure it came down to licensing and budget. And no mention of Kermit Ruffins or Rebirth Brass Band? Overall they did cover most styles and eras of local music.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by jjazznj View Post

          I thought they tried to cover a bit too much ground for under 2 hours and they kind of jumped all over the place. Lots of Harry Connick Jr and Terrance Blanchard who rarely ever play here or play New Orleans music. Plus some of the footage of bands playing was not their best like The Neville Brothers and The Radiators or Galactic where they kept showing Skerik who is not even in the band. I'm sure it came down to licensing and budget. And no mention of Kermit Ruffins or Rebirth Brass Band? Overall they did cover most styles and eras of local music.
          Agree that it was too much to cover in 2 hours. Should have been a mini series like Ken Burns "Jazz"! Enjoyed it, but would have preferred more historical footage and info than new performances of artists covering non-New Orleans tunes. Also. weren't some of the interviews & performances from "Make It Funky" ? I guess they figured after 15 years no once would care if they repeated.

          It is still a fun couple of hours for any fan of New Orleans music.
          Last edited by The Krewe of Chew; 2 weeks ago.

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          • #6
            Just finished watching this. Recommended.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by The Krewe of Chew View Post

              Agree that it was too much to cover in 2 hours. Should have been a mini series like Ken Burns "Jazz"! Enjoyed it, but would have preferred more historical footage and info than new performances of artists covering non-New Orleans tunes. Also. weren't some of the interviews & performances from "Make It Funky" ? I guess they figured after 15 years no once would care if they repeated.

              It is still a fun couple of hours for any fan of New Orleans music.
              Agree with a lot of this - It was a nice way to spend 2 hours, but as a film, it was a good example of telling vs showing. Also, Blanchard inserted himself a bit too much. Lastly, most of the interviews with famous musicians were so generic, they didn't add much.

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              • #8
                I watched that Robbie Robertson film "Once We Were Brothers" last night and it was drastically better than this movie. I'm sure some will think it is the history of The Band from his point of view but it is his movie. Overall highly recommended.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by jjazznj View Post
                  I watched that Robbie Robertson film "Once We Were Brothers" last night and it was drastically better than this movie. I'm sure some will think it is the history of The Band from his point of view but it is his movie. Overall highly recommended.
                  I have zero interest in this one. One of my best friends watched it and called it I'm Not The Guy Who Did All The Drugs And I Wrote Almost Every Band Song, confirming what I expected from this peacock. He said this review he found afterwards summed up his take pretty well:

                  https://uproxx.com/movies/once-we-we...ilm-fest-tiff/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Lit View Post


                    I have zero interest in this one. One of my best friends watched it and called it I'm Not The Guy Who Did All The Drugs And I Wrote Almost Every Band Song, confirming what I expected from this peacock. He said this review he found afterwards summed up his take pretty well:

                    https://uproxx.com/movies/once-we-we...ilm-fest-tiff/
                    Yeah I get it but it is still done well with lots of great footage. He does go overboard to make himself look good. I have no idea who wrote which songs but why didn't the other members insist on credits at the time? And who has gone on to make some very good albums and has written some very good songs since the Band? Only one guy I can think of. Levon Helm's solo albums are all pretty much filled with cover songs. And as the review states The Band did get back together and look what they put out; albums that no one even remembers.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by jjazznj View Post

                      Yeah I get it but it is still done well with lots of great footage. He does go overboard to make himself look good. I have no idea who wrote which songs but why didn't the other members insist on credits at the time? And who has gone on to make some very good albums and has written some very good songs since the Band? Only one guy I can think of. Levon Helm's solo albums are all pretty much filled with cover songs. And as the review states The Band did get back together and look what they put out; albums that no one even remembers.
                      I wasn’t in the room and obviously don’t know what happened, so we’re all relying on the versions of history told by people with a bias.

                      I love the Band and I credit Robbie with a majority of the lyrics. Levon says it was more collaborative and that Robbie took advantage of the lack of business sophistication of the others because he was the scribe writing stuff down while they were riffing or storytelling. I believe it given the content of many of the songs, which are drawn from Levon’s experience (e.g., Anna Lee was Levon’s friend; I met her). Levon left the Band for a while because he was so bummed about the reception they were getting when people were booing Dylan for going electric and apparently that’s when Dylan’s manager Albert Grossman bonded with Robbie and at some point whispered in his ear about the importance of getting the songwriting credits. The rest, as they say, is history. I also don’t blame Robbie for not succumbing to the drug abuse. He’s one of the last men standing so there was obviously a wisdom in his abstinence (which is notable if you see Festival Express, as he literally refused to get on the train).

                      I like Robbie’s solo work and I loved seeing Levon perform every chance I got, including four trips to his barn, one of which was with my kids, and the other three were with some of my favorite people on the planet. We met him a few times and I’d be lying if I didn’t admit to some bias myself. I don’t disagree with you about the Band’s albums after they got back together without Robbie with one exception: their cover of Bruce’s “Atlantic City” is one of the rare covers of a great song that I prefer to the original. Again, a big part of that may be my bias from the fact that it was a highlight of every show we saw at the barn.

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                      • #12
                        I've seen a lot of great shows in my life. One of the absolute best was the Band, circa 1983 when they first reformed ( with help from the Kate Brothers ). Saw them a few years later, a week after Richard committed suicide. I thought for sure the show would be cancelled, but they played with no piano and it was bittersweet, but a strong show. The last time I saw them was at Levon's club in the Quarter. Playing an uninspired set in front of less than 10 people...AT THIER CD RELEASE PARTY !! Rick looked So depressed and died a short time later.

                        But I'll put that 83 show up there with Queen, the Dead at their best, The Who, TTB and a few others as the best live music I've ever heard.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Marignygregg View Post
                          I've seen a lot of great shows in my life. One of the absolute best was the Band, circa 1983 when they first reformed ( with help from the Kate Brothers ). Saw them a few years later, a week after Richard committed suicide. I thought for sure the show would be cancelled, but they played with no piano and it was bittersweet, but a strong show. The last time I saw them was at Levon's club in the Quarter. Playing an uninspired set in front of less than 10 people...AT THIER CD RELEASE PARTY !! Rick looked So depressed and died a short time later.

                          But I'll put that 83 show up there with Queen, the Dead at their best, The Who, TTB and a few others as the best live music I've ever heard.
                          I forgot all about Levon's club over on Decatur. I never did get to see The Band but saw different combinations of Danko, Manuel and others at The Lone Star Cafe in NYC. I do remember want to go see them along with the Dead and Allmans at The Summer Jam at Watkins Glen in 1973 but my parents wouldn't let me go as I was only 14.

                          Queen back in '77 were one of the best rock shows I ever saw. Within a year I saw them, Bowie, Aerosmith and Led Zep all at Madison Square Garden in NYC and Queen were easily the most memorable. I saw them after that but they were never that good again.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by Lit View Post

                            I wasn’t in the room and obviously don’t know what happened, so we’re all relying on the versions of history told by people with a bias.

                            I love the Band and I credit Robbie with a majority of the lyrics. Levon says it was more collaborative and that Robbie took advantage of the lack of business sophistication of the others because he was the scribe writing stuff down while they were riffing or storytelling. I believe it given the content of many of the songs, which are drawn from Levon’s experience (e.g., Anna Lee was Levon’s friend; I met her). Levon left the Band for a while because he was so bummed about the reception they were getting when people were booing Dylan for going electric and apparently that’s when Dylan’s manager Albert Grossman bonded with Robbie and at some point whispered in his ear about the importance of getting the songwriting credits. The rest, as they say, is history. I also don’t blame Robbie for not succumbing to the drug abuse. He’s one of the last men standing so there was obviously a wisdom in his abstinence (which is notable if you see Festival Express, as he literally refused to get on the train).

                            I like Robbie’s solo work and I loved seeing Levon perform every chance I got, including four trips to his barn, one of which was with my kids, and the other three were with some of my favorite people on the planet. We met him a few times and I’d be lying if I didn’t admit to some bias myself. I don’t disagree with you about the Band’s albums after they got back together without Robbie with one exception: their cover of Bruce’s “Atlantic City” is one of the rare covers of a great song that I prefer to the original. Again, a big part of that may be my bias from the fact that it was a highlight of every show we saw at the barn.
                            I never got to The Barn. I had it on my radar when I was living right outside NYC and was talking about it to friends and then Levon passed. I do remember that version of Atlantic City, a song I love. Pretty cool. I really liked those last couple of "Dirt" albums that Levon put out before he passed but he did not write any of the songs on them. All that stuff about Dylan switching over to electric "Judas), The Band and Levon leaving was covered in the movie with some pretty cool footage.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Marignygregg View Post
                              I've seen a lot of great shows in my life. One of the absolute best was the Band, circa 1983 when they first reformed ( with help from the Kate Brothers ). Saw them a few years later, a week after Richard committed suicide. I thought for sure the show would be cancelled, but they played with no piano and it was bittersweet, but a strong show. The last time I saw them was at Levon's club in the Quarter. Playing an uninspired set in front of less than 10 people...AT THIER CD RELEASE PARTY !! Rick looked So depressed and died a short time later.

                              But I'll put that 83 show up there with Queen, the Dead at their best, The Who, TTB and a few others as the best live music I've ever heard.
                              Where was Levon's club?
                              Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

                              Comment

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