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  • Johnny White’s is closing

    The last real bar on Bourbon

  • #2
    What closed is Johnny White’s Corner Pub, Johnny White’s Hole in the Wall and Johnny White’s Pub & Grill, all housed at 718-720 Bourbon.

    The White family still operates the original Johnny White’s Bar at 733 St. Peter Street. A New Orleans dive bar institution for 51 years, it will reopen when coronavirus restrictions are lifted.

    https://www.nola.com/entertainment_l...cbc519cca.html
    Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

    Comment


    • #3
      The corner bar was my hang for many years. They redid it in 2012 and I haven't been in since. I'm glad the one on St. Peter is sticking around. I bet we will see a lot of places closing shop.

      Should start a thread 'Now Closed'.

      Comment


      • #4
        Originally posted by Marignygregg View Post
        Should start a thread 'Now Closed'.
        On Monday, stores, cafes, restaurants and bars here in Krakow were allowed to open for the first time since early March (grocery stores and gas stations were the only things operating during the lockdown) so naturally I wanted to go for a little walk, have a few beers to welcome the first steps to a return to some kind of "Normal". (though of course facemasks are still mandatory for all when in public)

        I assumed that the city would be buzzing with excitement, with cafes and pubs packed with people celebrating on a warm, beautiful Polish spring afternoon. Instead, less than half of the places were even open for business, with hundreds of various businesses still sitting shuttered, places that a couple of months before were always swarmed with customers, both locals and tourists alike, all of this desolation right in the heart of Krakow's Rynek Glowny (Old Town Square) which has to be the most expensive, sought-after and valuable commercial real-estate in the entire country. Most of the places that were open only had a handful of customers, with many completely empty except for the obviously worried, disheartened staff standing around with no one to wait on and nothing to do. From gourmet, fine-dining splurges where a modest lunch would cost more than a month's wage for an average Polsih worker to decrepit yet inviting local's dive bars, from tiny, tacky tourist souvenir kiosks to exclusive Italian designer clothing boutiques, an entire city sits in limbo.

        A few of these places are owned by my friends, people who I have known since first moving here in 2015, people who were kind and welcoming to me when I literally didn't know a soul here, people whom I have shared the past 5 years of my life with, people who danced at my wedding, now out of work, unsure of what to do, or how they will provide for their families.

        It was depressing beyond words.
        ----------------------
        Tens of millions of people, hundreds of thousands of businesses, in a thousand different cities around the world, all with no idea of what is coming next.
        -------------------------
        I should add that this is in a country of 30,000,000 that has less than 900 total Corona Virus deaths, 90% of which the victims were at least 70 years old. (of course every life is worthwhile, young and old alike, but it is obvious there is one specific population that is most at risk, by in large, healthy young people are NOT dying en masse). I realize every country is different, and One Size Does Not Fit All when it comes to the best course of action to fight this disease, but in some cases, it is clear to me that the wholesale disruption of daily life for billions of people, one that is currently causing unprecedented economic devastation worldwide, (including places minimally impacted by the actual medical pandemic) will be shown to be the real adversary once all is said and done.

        Stay well and look out for one another, we are all in this together, for better or worse.

        MM
        Last edited by MormonMatthew; 1 week ago.

        Comment


        • #5
          Hey now, Matthew! My son has been in Poznan for about 8 months now. If you're going to be over that way, let me know. Maybe y'all can have a beer now that things are opening up.


          Originally posted by MormonMatthew View Post

          On Monday, stores, cafes, restaurants and bars here in Krakow were allowed to open for the first time since early March (grocery stores and gas stations were the only things operating during the lockdown) so naturally I wanted to go for a little walk, have a few beers to welcome the first steps to a return to some kind of "Normal". (though of course facemasks are still mandatory for all when in public)

          I assumed that the city would be buzzing with excitement, with cafes and pubs packed with people celebrating on a warm, beautiful Polish spring afternoon. Instead, less than half of the places were even open for business, with hundreds of various businesses still sitting shuttered, places that a couple of months before were always swarmed with customers, both locals and tourists alike, all of this desolation right in the heart of Krakow's Rynek Glowny (Old Town Square) which has to be the most expensive, sought-after and valuable commercial real-estate in the entire country. Most of the places that were open only had a handful of customers, with many completely empty except for the obviously worried, disheartened staff standing around with no one to wait on and nothing to do. From gourmet, fine-dining splurges where a modest lunch would cost more than a month's wage for an average Polsih worker to decrepit yet inviting local's dive bars, from tiny, tacky tourist souvenir kiosks to exclusive Italian designer clothing boutiques, an entire city sits in limbo.

          A few of these places are owned by my friends, people who I have known since first moving here in 2015, people who were kind and welcoming to me when I literally didn't know a soul here, people whom I have shared the past 5 years of my life with, people who danced at my wedding, now out of work, unsure of what to do, or how they will provide for their families.

          It was depressing beyond words.
          ----------------------
          Tens of millions of people, hundreds of thousands of businesses, in a thousand different cities around the world, all with no idea of what is coming next.
          -------------------------
          I should add that this is in a country of 30,000,000 that has less than 900 total Corona Virus deaths, 90% of which the victims were at least 70 years old. (of course every life is worthwhile, young and old alike, but it is obvious there is one specific population that is most at risk, by in large, healthy young people are NOT dying en masse). I realize every country is different, and One Size Does Not Fit All when it comes to the best course of action to fight this disease, but in some cases, it is clear to me that the wholesale disruption of daily life for billions of people, one that is currently causing unprecedented economic devastation worldwide, (including places minimally impacted by the actual medical pandemic) will be shown to be the real adversary once all is said and done.

          Stay well and look out for one another, we are all in this together, for better or worse.

          MM

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by MormonMatthew View Post

            it is clear to me that the wholesale disruption of daily life for billions of people, one that is currently causing unprecedented economic devastation worldwide, (including places minimally impacted by the actual medical pandemic) will be shown to be the real adversary once all is said and done.

            MM
            I disagree. More than 300,00 people have already died from COVID-19 and the number climbs daily. If Poland hasn’t yet been overrun yet it is probably just luck and the social distancing measures that are the only known way to combat the virus. As Yogi said, it tough to make predictions, especially about the future, but I will say that with the insipid and insane response of the U..S. the rest of the entire world — never mind America — is in grave danger of being forced into herd immunity. After all, what is likely to happen to countries that attempt to ban U.S. travelers because the virus is running rampant in America (which it is, with infection rates out of control in nearly half our states, many of which are re-opening anyway)? Herd immunity for this coronavirus requires a minimum of 65% infection (and probably higher). The world population is 7.58 billion. The COVID-19 death rate appears to be approximately 1% (and not only old people). If the world “achieves” herd immunity, it will be at the cost of more than 75 million deaths. Until there is a vaccine (or viable treatment) social distancing is the only protection we have. Which is probably why people are not rushing out everywhere the moment things re-open. People want to stay alive and at least some want to keep other people healthy too. The economic problems attending social distancing are very real, but they can be solved by a different socioeconomic approach. The coronavirus doesn’t care that we lack the imagination to keep our people secure while we wait for a vaccine or treatment.
            Last edited by BostonDavid; 1 week ago.

            Comment


            • #7
              Originally posted by BostonDavid View Post
              I disagree.
              You may well be right, Lord knows I have been wrong many, many times before.

              You certainly might have more insight and knowlege than the majority of average Americans, (including as of yesterday one Dr. A. Fauci, whoever he is) who according to several recent surveys seem to overwhelmingly feel that it is time to prudently and cautiously start getting back to life as normal, whenever and wherever practical.

              No one is advocating marching sweet, sickly Grammaw down to Happy Hour at Applebee's at gunpoint, if you are concerned about the risk of being in a public area, by all means, stay home, but those who are intelligent enough to calculate the risks for themselves (including workers, consumers and suppliers) and are willing to take proper common-sense safety precautions, need to be allowed to get back to work.
              ---------------------------
              ETA---Oh yeah, I almost forgot, "75 million deaths" ?!!!?

              Oooh Wheee---Poor ol' Nuggertuts must have just popped in his Dr. Daddy's britches from excitement.
              Last edited by MormonMatthew; 1 week ago.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by MormonMatthew View Post

                You may well be right, Lord knows I have been wrong many, many times before.

                You certainly might have more insight and knowlege than the majority of average Americans, (including as of yesterday one Dr. A. Fauci, whoever he is) who according to several recent surveys seem to overwhelmingly feel that it is time to prudently and cautiously start getting back to life as normal, whenever and wherever practical.

                No one is advocating marching sweet, sickly Grammaw down to Happy Hour at Applebee's at gunpoint, if you are concerned about the risk of being in a public area, by all means, stay home, but those who are intelligent enough to calculate the risks for themselves (including workers, consumers and suppliers) and are willing to take proper common-sense safety precautions, need to be allowed to get back to work.
                ---------------------------
                ETA---Oh yeah, I forgot, "75 million deaths"?!!!?

                Oooh Wheee---Poor ol' Tuggernuts must have just popped from excitement in his Dr. Daddy's britches.
                Dr. Fauci says prolonged isolation is deleterious. I absolutely agree. It sucks, and a lot of people — including me — have endured it for 2 months. Due to impatience, ideology, and politics things are now re-opening prematurely. Dr. Fauci has warned against this repeatedly but he, of course, is being ignored (and is also one sideways remark from forced retirement). Look at Georgia. Florida. Disasters waiting to happen. The countries that have wrestled the virus under control with social distancing — like Spain and Italy - endured far more severe social restrictions for a third month and that seemed to make the difference. We in the U.S. got bored or whatever and decided to give up after 2 months and that is failing. It is like being in a marathon and quitting 20 miles in. And it means we might have to do it all over again. Which really sucks. We could have handled this like a wealthy, sensible, intelligent country but we didn’t and now Americans and the rest of the world will pay the consequences. Of course, like you said, I could be wrong and I sincerely hope I am because the herd immunity experiment is now underway and we’re all subjects, even the ones clamoring for the “freedom“ to infect themselves and others. I will also add that, apart from the economic consequences (which could be ameliorated with the right policies), the social distancing sucks but isn’t exactly the Siege of Leningrad. And even the quarantine could easily be made more bearable. If, for example, we dedicated a ton of money to establish a series of livestream quarantine concerts, which would helped musicians weather the storm and cheered people up. There are lots of other things that could be done to make quarantine less awful but we didn’t do anything but complain. I see videos now of shoppers coughing and spitting in the faces of the minimum-wage workers telling them they have to wear masks. That is American freedom in action and it is what we are forcing on the rest of the world. God forgive us.

                We disagree and that’s fine. I don’t find much funny about it, however.
                Last edited by BostonDavid; 1 week ago.

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by MormonMatthew View Post

                  You may well be right, Lord knows I have been wrong many, many times before.

                  You certainly might have more insight and knowlege than the majority of average Americans, (including as of yesterday one Dr. A. Fauci, whoever he is) who according to several recent surveys seem to overwhelmingly feel that it is time to prudently and cautiously start getting back to life as normal, whenever and wherever practical.

                  No one is advocating marching sweet, sickly Grammaw down to Happy Hour at Applebee's at gunpoint, if you are concerned about the risk of being in a public area, by all means, stay home, but those who are intelligent enough to calculate the risks for themselves (including workers, consumers and suppliers) and are willing to take proper common-sense safety precautions, need to be allowed to get back to work.
                  ---------------------------
                  ETA---Oh yeah, I almost forgot, "75 million deaths" ?!!!?

                  Oooh Wheee---Poor ol' Nuggertuts must have just popped in his Dr. Daddy's britches from excitement.
                  MM, here is what Poland would look like if the plague hit Poland as strongly as it did Orleans Parish:

                  Orleans Parish population 393,000; total cases 6944 (1 out of every 56 New Orleanians has tested positive despite a lack of widespread testing); total deaths 500 (1 out of every 786 New Orleanians has already died from the plague).

                  Thus Poland, with the population you noted of 30 million, if exposed in the same way as New Orleans, would have over 535,000 cases and over 38,000 people dead.

                  Open Krakow or Warsaw up to thousands of international tourists for a Mardi Gras-like event (I don't know a major event in Krakow to give you as an example) and those are the type of numbers you can expect to see in the next 90 days.

                  That said, with pretty damn rigid social distancing and business shutdowns put in place about 8 weeks ago, no one in New Orleans died today.

                  But now the businesses are reopening and social distancing is fading. We in New Orleans will likely stay relatively safe, as our summer is the opposite of tourist season, even in a good year. But SEC football begins the last week of August, and if they don't reduce the size of crowds permitted at such events (ie.., if they let 100K people cram into Tiger Stadium on Saturdays and 70K into the dome on Saints Sundays) I think we can expect to see this rebound much more fiercely in October and November, and then you're in a global pandemic and only 90 days away from mardi gras again.................

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    According to NOLA there are 836 people in the hospital in the whole state of Louisiana due to Covid as of today/yesterday. Be careful and stay safe.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by innertube View Post
                      According to NOLA there are 836 people in the hospital in the whole state of Louisiana due to Covid as of today/yesterday. Be careful and stay safe.
                      No deaths here in NOLA since Wed. Hurray!

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BostonDavid View Post
                        If, for example, we dedicated a ton of money to establish a series of livestream quarantine concerts, which would helped musicians weather the storm and cheered people up.
                        I am sure that the millions of restaurant, theater, hotel, event venue and other various live entertainment workers currently out of work (many staring down imminent homelessness) would really welcome an effort like that, who couldn't use a little cheering up?

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by MormonMatthew View Post

                          I am sure that the millions of restaurant, theater, hotel, event venue and other various live entertainment workers currently out of work (many staring down imminent homelessness) would really welcome an effort like that, who couldn't use a little cheering up?
                          I already said too much, much too stridently. My apologies. I hope it all works out.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by HankAndLeeStamper View Post

                            MM, here is what Poland would look like if the plague hit Poland as strongly as it did Orleans Parish:

                            Orleans Parish population 393,000; total cases 6944 (1 out of every 56 New Orleanians has tested positive despite a lack of widespread testing); total deaths 500 (1 out of every 786 New Orleanians has already died from the plague).

                            Thus Poland, with the population you noted of 30 million, if exposed in the same way as New Orleans, would have over 535,000 cases and over 38,000 people dead.

                            Open Krakow or Warsaw up to thousands of international tourists for a Mardi Gras-like event (I don't know a major event in Krakow to give you as an example) and those are the type of numbers you can expect to see in the next 90 days.

                            That said, with pretty damn rigid social distancing and business shutdowns put in place about 8 weeks ago, no one in New Orleans died today.

                            But now the businesses are reopening and social distancing is fading. We in New Orleans will likely stay relatively safe, as our summer is the opposite of tourist season, even in a good year. But SEC football begins the last week of August, and if they don't reduce the size of crowds permitted at such events (ie.., if they let 100K people cram into Tiger Stadium on Saturdays and 70K into the dome on Saints Sundays) I think we can expect to see this rebound much more fiercely in October and November, and then you're in a global pandemic and only 90 days away from mardi gras again.................
                            Completely agree.

                            The idiocy of people on the beaches in Alabama and elsewhere over the weekend made the news down here, where we have taken this virus very seriously, and once again I also saw lots of photos and other vision of people in Nola and surrounds refusing to wear masks. A couple of enlightened people interviewed said having to wear a mask is an infringement of their civil liberty and others raved on about how if your going to get, your going to get it.
                            If I was the interviewer I would have said to them, "well if you are going to spread it you are going to spread it".

                            The next item on the news was about the very sad situation now ongoing in Brazil, whose foolish supposed leader was announced as being a strong ally of the corpulent orange cretin in Washington. The failure to enact proper safety policies in Brazil could now have huge ramifications there and elsewhere, and I note that people are now denied access to the USA from Brazil, yet people in the US are whingeing about sensible precautions to contain the virus in their own backyard.

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