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Where to safely hear live music in New Orleans ?

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  • https://www.nola.com/entertainment_l...cdcb8dc6d.html

    Outdoor live music in New Orleans faces hurdles: 'There is a market for doing things differently'

    When indoor live music was temporarily unplugged by the coronavirus pandemic, a handful of New Orleans venues pivoted to presenting music outdoors.

    Whether they would continue beyond the pandemic wasn’t clear.

    And as the divergent fates of two of the city's most prominent outdoor venues indicate, it still isn’t.

    This week Tom Thayer, proprietor of popular Frenchmen Street music venue and bar d.b.a., shut down d.b.a. at Palace Market, the outdoor venue he opened in May in a former art market across the street from his club.

    He cited the cooler weather, slower than expected business, the pending sale of the property and high overhead, including thousands of dollars he paid monthly for special event permits and fees.

    Meanwhile, the largest of the new outdoor venues, the Broadside, appears to finally be on its way to achieving permanent status – albeit in a roundabout way.

    Brian Knighten, owner of the Broad Street Theater, opened the Broadside in a lot adjacent to the theater in 2020. With a small stage and Adirondack-style chairs spread across the broad yard, he presented live local music for socially distanced audiences. The musicians made badly needed money, and he replaced some of the income his shuttered movie theater lost.

    As COVID restrictions eased, the Broadside increased its capacity. Jon Cleary, Tank & the Bangas, the Soul Rebels and the Cuban band Cimafunk played to several hundred paying customers as audiences embraced this new, unique New Orleans venue.

    During a summer hiatus, Knighten hoped to upgrade the Broadside with a bigger, covered stage, and permanent bathroom and bar facilities.

    But he was reluctant to invest more money without knowing if the city would allow him to keep presenting music.

    Since its opening, the Broadside has operated with a special event permit issued under emergency COVID rules by the Department of Safety and Permits.

    But once the emergency rules expired, Knighten feared the city might pull the plug. Normally, the city’s tangle of zoning, noise and entertainment ordinances and permits do not allow outdoor music at venues other than festivals.

    So he held off on the renovations. For months, he navigated the city’s byzantine permitting process, working with city council members and City Planning Commission staffers to figure out how to get a permanent permit.

    So far, he has appeared at seven public hearings to vet his plans: three each with the planning commission board and the city council, plus a neighborhood participation meeting.

    District B councilmember Jay Banks has been impressed by the Broadside team’s due diligence. “They have been a model,” Banks said. “I wish I could bottle what they do. They’ve been very easy to work with.”

    To keep live music beyond the COVID emergency, the Broadside needed a zoning change and a conditional use permit to serve alcohol. It also needed an “outdoor amusements” permit, which allows a venue to host film screenings, theatrical and dance performances, even go-karts – but not live music.

    Solving that dilemma required improvisation.

    After consulting with planning commission staffers, Knighten decided the best path forward was to rechristen the Broadside as an amphitheater. He then submitted a request that amphitheaters be permitted in the section of the arts and cultural district overlay that includes the 600 block of North Broad.

    “That was the work-around and compromise we were able to negotiate with city planning,” Knighten said. “It’s a multi-multi-step process. It’s been complicated.”

    To qualify as an amphitheater, Knighten needs to build a clamshell-style stage. He also plans to build a 400-capacity indoor venue to host shows in bad weather.

    The amphitheater application ultimately must be drawn up as an ordinance and signed by Mayor LaToya Cantrell.

    But first it must be formally drafted by the City Planning Commission staff and submitted to the commission’s board and the City Council for approval.

    “If there’s one thing COVID has taught us, it’s that there is a market for doing things differently,” District A councilmember Joe Giarrusso said. “For Brian to move from a theater to an outdoor amphitheater is part of that.”

    The mayor and the city council “both have been super-supportive of outdoor live music,” Knighten said. “They recognize the work we are doing not only values musicians, but is economic development along a corridor that has stagnated over the years.”

    What has happened with d.b.a. at Palace Market and the Broadside demonstrates that both the permitting process and fee structure need overhauling, Giarrusso said.

    “The price has to be fair and right. It needs to be a streamlined process, where you can apply and know what the rules of the road are, and there’s predictability to the process.”

    With outdoor music specifically, Giarrusso said, the question is, “How do we make sure we’re doing this in the right places and venues, but also how do we make it a simple process so there’s not a lot of red tape and hoops to jump through?”

    Banks agrees. The process “is better than where it was, but it’s not where it needs to be. When this is done, we’re going to get something workable. Everybody needs to know the rules of the road and know what’s in-bounds and what isn’t.”

    A priority, Banks said, is making sure live music, especially outdoors, fits in with the surrounding neighborhood.

    “We want to have that magical culture of New Orleans, but also quality of life for residents,” Banks said. “These are not mutually exclusive.”

    Meanwhile, Knighten plans to shut the Broadside on Dec. 30 – due to its 10 p.m. curfew, it won’t host a New Year’s Eve event – and start construction on his new stage.
    He’s already booked gigs for late April and early May, during what the whole local music community hopes will be the triumphant 2022 return of the New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival.

    “I feel confident enough,” Knighten said, “that I can start moving ahead with the plans.”
    It's nuts to me that they say "The mayor and the city council “both have been super-supportive of outdoor live music,”", when one venue shuts in large part because of the cost of permits, and another can't get their zoning yet because the stage is the wrong shape. But I'm happy that at least the Broadside seems to be on a path to permanency.
    Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

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    • Originally posted by swag View Post
      https://www.nola.com/entertainment_l...cdcb8dc6d.html



      It's nuts to me that they say "The mayor and the city council “both have been super-supportive of outdoor live music,”", when one venue shuts in large part because of the cost of permits, and another can't get their zoning yet because the stage is the wrong shape. But I'm happy that at least the Broadside seems to be on a path to permanency.
      Yup, it's straight out of Kafka.

      Comment



      • A live show would be exactly what I need right now. It's been so long since I was in a party with many people and everyone having fun with no restrictions and stuff like this. It's nice to see that many artists are already using billboard advertising, and coming back to live concerts little by little. If there will be any close to my city, I will definitely go, missing that vibe so much. Summer is already in 3 months, so joining a fest or something would be great as well.
        Last edited by nicholascam; 02-25-2022, 01:58 AM.

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        • Faubourg had moved the music inside the taproom for the winter months, but starting this weekend, music is back outdoors on their great lawn.
          Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

          Comment


          • Originally posted by swag View Post
            Faubourg had moved the music inside the taproom for the winter months, but starting this weekend, music is back outdoors on their great lawn.
            Good to hear and I look forward to being able to get to a show out there

            Comment


            • Originally posted by Gards View Post

              Good to hear and I look forward to being able to get to a show out there
              Great place for outdoor music, and the beverages ain't bad at all. Sounds and suds!

              Comment


              • Originally posted by Kemp View Post

                Great place for outdoor music, and the beverages ain't bad at all. Sounds and suds!
                I can dig that

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                • Broadside re-opens this Wednesday.

                  It's hard to see renovations from the street, but the new stage structure looks bigger, and has been re-oriented to point more towards Broad St.
                  Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

                  Comment


                  • Saw an incredible set by Joshua Redman at the Ellis Marsalis Center in Musician's Village last night. I thought he would play with a pickup local band but, no...it was Brian Blade on drums, Aaron Parks (who is in James Farm with Joshua, maybe my favorite of all Redman's projects) on piano, a great young bass player named Ron Sanders and a female vocalist named Gabrielle Cavassa (who I believe lives in New Orleans.) They did a bunch of tunes with geography in the title...Springsteen's "Streets Of Philadelphia," Glen Campbell's "By The Time I Get To Phoenix," a medley of "Stars Fell On Alabama" and Coltrane's "Alabama" (with Aaron channeling McCoy Tyner.) Joshua says they are going into the studio immediately (and, by some reports, may have started already at Marigny Studios.)

                    This was absolutely top drawer.

                    The host said this was the first concert in the facility post pandemic and I overheard someone say Ellis Marsalis himself was the last to play there before this. I mention it here because if ever someone you like plays there, go. The venue is first rate, maybe even nicer than the one at the Jazz & Heritage Foundation building on Rampart.
                    Last edited by chopitulas; 04-04-2022, 04:34 PM.

                    Comment


                    • Originally posted by chopitulas View Post
                      This was absolutely top drawer.

                      The host said this was the first concert in the facility post pandemic and I overheard someone say Ellis Marsalis himself was the last to play there before this. I mention it here because if ever someone you like plays there, go. The venue is first rate, maybe even nicer than the one at the Jazz & Heritage Foundation building on Rampart.
                      This is good news. It is wonderful space (although seating capacity is too low for the amount of money that was spent on it,) and I hope it they will find away to greater utilize it.

                      Comment


                      • Originally posted by swag View Post
                        Broadside re-opens this Wednesday.

                        It's hard to see renovations from the street, but the new stage structure looks bigger, and has been re-oriented to point more towards Broad St.
                        Yeah I've been meaning to post about it. I workout on the Greenway right near there and have been peeking through the fence lately. The are using a bout half of that empty lot behind the old venue for the new stage which is a bit larger and covered and as you said points right at Broad St. I did see some of the old chairs but not as many and also some tables. Something was going on there last Friday, maybe a kids show? The new stage does not really looked finished yet but who knows? Hard to tell but I think they are making permanent rest rooms and concessions also. We shall see.

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                        • Offbeat reports:

                          The Frenchmen Hotel has opened a new live music venue called Midnight Revival. The music club, located at 417 Frenchmen Street, will host live music and events during the French Quarter Festival and the New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival.

                          Midnight Revival is an outdoor rooftop venue with a craft cocktail bar and stage. A grand opening week of music performances will include the local jazz fusion all-star band Slugger, vinyl enthusiast DJ Doug Funnie, Sasha Masakowski’s newest project Trash Magnolia, and a French Quarter Festival After Dark special performance from Louisiana-based Americana band Holly Rock featuring members of The Iceman Special. To check out the full music lineup and purchase tickets visit here.

                          Slugger is a side project of Naughty Professor’s bassist Noah Young, Tank and the Bangas’ keyboardist Joe Johnson and George Porter, Jr.’s drummer Terrence Houston, along with a relatively new guitarist on the scene, Max Bronstein.

                          Masakowski describes Trash Magnolia as her “alter-ego” with “compositions that are bold, adventurous sonic explorations that combine elements of EDM, art-pop, and progressive rock.”

                          Midnight Revival’s music program will be curated by New Orleans-based events team Fox Pocket. The space will also offer special event opportunities in collaboration with owner Angevin & Co.

                          https://www.offbeat.com/news/frenchm...e-music-venue/
                          Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

                          Comment


                          • The Portside Lounge is closing.

                            "It is with an extremely heavy heart that I make the announcement that I will be closing down The Portside Lounge.. it’s been a wild ride with a ton of amazing people, artists, and musicians.. but nothing lasts forever.. and all good things must come to an end.. this weekend will be our grand finale with plenty of music all weekend long and The UNNATURALS on the 4th of July.. they played the first show here and now they shall play the last.. so join us one last weekend just due north of the street car line where 7th meets Dryades for the final days of our island escape.. we will be open tonight at 6pm for Craig’s @craigfordvoncraigenstein last shift so come show him some love.. then it’s all about this last weekend… hope to see every single one of y’all and thank you for helping me make this place our own little slice of paradise.. much love to all y’all"

                            https://www.facebook.com/PortsideNOLA/
                            Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

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