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RIP - Toots

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  • RIP - Toots

    Toots Hibbert
    December 8, 1942 - September 11, 2020

    He was always on my list of BNA’s.
    A true legend!
    Last edited by Thraak; 1 week ago.

  • #2
    RIP to one of the greatest voices of all time. Great collaborator, too. The True Love album is still in frequent rotation for me. Will have to throw that on today.

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    • #3
      This is awful. Another legend lost to covid.
      Last edited by TornAndFrayed; 1 week ago.

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      • #4
        One of my first live shows was the Maytals at Winterland opening for Santana. Loved the soul of Toots and his band.

        Tough times, "Time tough"


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        • #5
          Damned sad, in addition to losing a venerable and still-vibrant performer. I’ll be thinking about ghose Toots Fest performances.

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          • #6
            Got to see him over at least 3 maybe even 4 different decades. Loved all of the Maytal's stuff but also loved his album of soul covers "Toots In Memphis' released back in '88. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?lis...NHcK6duhHDgQEo
            RIP Toots.

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            • #7
              Great singer and interpreter of songs. Anders opened for him on a wonderful night by the James River in Richmond ruined when a drunk, rich brat threw an empty vodka bottle and hit Toots in the head. RIP, sir, and thanks for the wonderful music.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by Meters Fan View Post
                One of my first live shows was the Maytals at Winterland opening for Santana. Loved the soul of Toots and his band.
                I know I saw him in that time frame at Winterland but have zero recollection of Santana. But I don't see any other shows he played at Winterland around then so this musta been it. I do remember that suit he's wearing in the video.

                The Bay Area was a reggae hotbed at the time with "Harder They Come" playing at the Midnight Movies and Bob Marley and The Wailers having done 4 sold out shows at the Boarding House that caused a huge splash, one of which was famously broadcast on KSAN. I remember seeing people from the Dead and the Airplane in line just like the rest of us punters. Toots' reputation preceeded him so his coming to SF was highly anticipated, as well.

                Toots was a powerful presence on stage. That was a MAN!

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                • #9
                  Rest in Peace, Toots. aka: Frederick N. Hibbert
                  "54-46 That's My Number"
                  Do they make 'em like that, any more...?

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by chopitulas View Post

                    I remember seeing people from the Dead and the Airplane in line just like the rest of us punters. Toots' reputation preceeded him so his coming to SF was highly anticipated, as well.

                    !
                    True that. When I went to see the Wailers at the Paramount (1976?) Garcia walked down the aisle and sat front row. This was on the "year off" when he was immersed in edit8ing the movie.

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                    • #11
                      I was so sad to wake up this morning and hear about the passing of Toots Hibbert. Like so many people, I’ve loved his music my entire life. It was ubiquitous, playing at parties and gatherings. It felt like an element, like air.

                      In 2003, I was asked to play on Toot’s new album, True Love. I was told that the Maytals were coming to the Barn to record.

                      When Toots and the band arrived for the session, I was nervous and basically speechless. Toots was a ray of light, so kind and welcoming. The guys in the band hovered in the corner, smoking more ganja than I had ever seen consumed. We decided to play Sweet and Dandy. I was a bit mortified and confused as to why such an iconic song should be re-released, but we recorded it, and it was was a thrill.

                      What happened next I will never forget for as long as I live. Toots was supposed to do a song with Willie Nelson, but Willie was not there of course. Toots began searching, playing different Willie songs deafeningly loud through the giant speakers in the barn, while a bunch of us stood next to him by the soundboard. He said that he had to believe every single word in order to sing a song, a lesson I’ll never forget. He heard “Still is Still Moving to Me” and liked the song, and then as I stood watching, he and the Maytals recorded that track, live in the barn. Willie added his vocal after the fact. As long as I live, I will never forget watching it all go down. On playback, the engineer turned the bass ALL the way up. I don’t even know how to describe how booming it was. The bass knob was pinned to the right and the speakers were on 10. I’ve never heard bass that loud in my life. The barn was literally shaking. My guts were shaking. It was incredible. Toots sang his vocal, moving and dancing with his body, embodying every single syllable, like an open tube to the cosmos.

                      Thank you Toots for a lifetime of joy and blessings. Rest In Peace. - Trey Anastasio

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Meters Fan View Post

                        True that. When I went to see the Wailers at the Paramount (1976?) Garcia walked down the aisle and sat front row. This was on the "year off" when he was immersed in edit8ing the movie.
                        That was '76, Bob and the band's return to the Bay Area after the smash of the Boarding House shows in 1975. I remember going there at lunchtime from work to buy tickets and, on my bus ride back, I saw Bob standing on Bush St. looking around kind of incredulously taking in Babylon. My bandmate didn't want to go to the Boarding House, he thought it was Harry Belafonte-like calypso even though I tried to explain it was much harder edged. I sold his ticket, had a couple beers and a spliff and went back for the 2nd show.

                        My buddy had changed his tune by the Paramount show, largely because we used to listen to the KSAN broadcast of the Boarding House show over and over. I had tickets in like the third row at the Paramount but didn't see Jerry. I will never forget the end of that show when the band did a 20-minute "War/No Trouble." Bob went dancing off stage right, dreadlocks flying. I was close enough I could see the stage behind the band. As Bob danced off, a stagehand opened the side door and Bob danced right out of the building without pausing a second. He was so transcendently high, it felt like he woulda went right through the wall if the door wasn't there and open...

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by McGregor View Post
                          Toots sang his vocal, moving and dancing with his body, embodying every single syllable, like an open tube to the cosmos.
                          This is a great depiction of what I feel and envision when I hear him sing.

                          Thanks to jjazznj 's mention of Toots in Memphis and a few other favorable comments I read about it elsewhere, I picked it up this weekend have listened to it several times since on a loop. What a great record. Never realized how much his timbre has in common with Otis Redding's. And his take on "Knock on Wood" kills me every time; I love the "tunder."

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                          • #14
                            Toots at the independent in sf was one of the last shows I saw before covid stay at home...antibalas was the absolute last also at the independent...

                            We were front row obviously and the energy exchange was off the hook...amazing...total back and forth and call outs from toots....damn that is the shit I can't get any other way and totally cut off now...both sides

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                            • #15
                              Loved that guy! My first ever live reggae show was mid 70s, Beacon Theater, NYC. One of my favorite live shows ever, positively euphoric. Might well have been the same tour in 1975 at Winterland that people are talking about...
                              I'm sure older fans realize that in the last several years, his band was no longer the original Maytals, who were a vocal group like the Temptations, with different, younger, & less awesome musicians too.
                              What a loss...

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