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  • #16
    Originally posted by CEfromLA View Post

    Paradoxically, the homeless population has a surprisingly low incident of Covid, and no one can explain why.....
    I claim zero expertise, but I think there is some research suggesting that Vitamin D (sun exposure) can help mitigate susceptibility to Covid. This is anecdotal, but I think it has also been noted that dock workers and other who spent a lot of time outside had lower rates of incidence during the Spanish flu despite their exposure to it.

    But it would probably be helpful if someone who really knew what they were talking about weighed in.

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by resmp View Post

      I claim zero expertise, but I think there is some research suggesting that Vitamin D (sun exposure) can help mitigate susceptibility to Covid. This is anecdotal, but I think it has also been noted that dock workers and other who spent a lot of time outside had lower rates of incidence during the Spanish flu despite their exposure to it.

      But it would probably be helpful if someone who really knew what they were talking about weighed in.
      Well if that theory has any validity to it then it would seem to me to be right, proper and humane to get the inmates out of their cells in the jails and prisons that have had such Covid issues and outbreaks that have been in the news and put them in crews cleaning up our highways, the fire damage throughout the western states and other projects that would get them out in the sun. It would help them and help the municipalities and states.. Win-Win. Everybody wins.

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      • #18
        Being outdoors and socially-distanced is recognized as less risky than indoors and crowded, I think.

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by CEfromLA View Post

          Paradoxically, the homeless population has a surprisingly low incident of Covid, and no one can explain why.....
          Are you sure? Kind of hard to believe...could you show some data?
          I know this is old, but: https://www.factcheck.org/2020/05/fa...-the-homeless/

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          • #20
            Originally posted by 20/20 View Post

            One can only hope that none of this has had a negative impact upon the needle exchange program?
            You think thats funny???

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by revjimk View Post

              Are you sure? Kind of hard to believe...could you show some data?
              I know this is old, but: https://www.factcheck.org/2020/05/fa...-the-homeless/
              That article seems to be concentrating on shelters and symptomatic patients. I'm not surprised that people living on the street with poor nutrition, hygiene and resources have a higher mortality, but that doesn't speak to the overall incidence of positive cases. From everything I've seen, the unsheltered are less likely than those using the shelters to contract the virus. Studies in large cities seem to bear that out, with the highest reports of positives in large cities who also have the highest proportion of homeless using the shelters. Large cities where the homeless are more likely to be unsheltered are generally showing lower numbers.

              For a recent article on the topic;
              https://apnews.com/595410c64aff65fd0e053e9657e7f928
              "In a country that’s surpassed 5 million identified cases and 169,000 deaths, researchers don’t know why there appear to be so few outbreaks among the homeless."

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              • #22
                OK, you're saying people who live outside have done better than those in shelters. That makes sense. But I don't see where the homeless fare better than general population. Article seems to be saying situation among homeless isn't as bad as expected...

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by revjimk View Post

                  Are you sure? Kind of hard to believe...could you show some data?
                  I know this is old, but: https://www.factcheck.org/2020/05/fa...-the-homeless/
                  https://www.latimes.com/california/s...omeless-people

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    Some rare good news!

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Originally posted by CEfromLA View Post
                      In Los Angeles, you are still required to wear a mask when outside.
                      No indoor dining, no bars, no hair salons, no gyms, no movie theaters.
                      Patio dining is allowed; it's amazing how many parking lots and sidewalks are now outdoor dining areas. Masks required unless sitting at a table, eating. Servers are wearing masks and face shields (in our experience, which is limited; three restaurant outings since March).
                      No live music except drive-up concerts, but those seem to be more in outlying areas.
                      Kids are still remote learning (as far as I know), with the exception of special needs kids and some non-english speakers.

                      It's been incomprehensible.....
                      Concur with CEfromLA’s assessment of L.A. (not to be confused with LA). My wife and I have been self-isolating since March. Have not been to a restaurant other than for take-out, although we are thinking about doing outdoor patio dining for the first time this weekend with a couple of friends. “Strange Days” as Jim Morrison would say.

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                      • #26
                        Recently, I was "at" New Orleans for the first time in six months, my longest absence in twelve years. Yes, it was different, but New Orleans never disappoints. On our second day, just down the street from us, The Tin Men did a free show on Rick Trolsen's porch. Most people were masked and social distanced on a near perfect afternoon after dodging Storm Sally. We saw Rosetree briefly, and I'm told Swag was there. Sitting outside in the park in front of the big catholic church in Algiers Point with a small cooler of adult beverages listening to Alex, Matt and Chazz was one of the best things to happen to me since this "hoax" reared its ugly head and sent us fleeing NOLA back in March. A few days later, we saw Honey Island on the balcony of The Jazz Museum in a similar outdoor situation. They played great with good sound from my vantage point and I am told that a few other Threadheads were in attendance, but most folks were masked and hard to recognize. Again, I was energized. The HISB show was our only venture across the river because we had things to tend to in The Point. The city was subdued. Restaurants were allowed to open with limited occupancy, but we are wary of being indoors with others. We had great take out on our side of the river from a new Indian place called Plume (yum), The Appetite Repair Shop (yum), and Tavolino's pizza (yum), and had a steak on the grill and a shrimp low country boil back in the court yard. Seeing the Old Point and The Crown and Anchor closed almost gave me the blues, but it ain't always going to be like this. And believe it or not, The Old Point actually did repairs to the sagging outdoor awning that has seemed so precarious for years! Overall, folks in the limited parts of the city I saw appear to be taking things seriously and I felt safe. The Richmond/Williamsburg section of Virginia also mostly adheres to masking and distancing. The only city I've spent any time in in North Carolina is Wilmington and folks there are also, for the most part, in compliance with the necessary precautions. Not so, in my little NC hometown. I won't go into details, but I don't venture out much. Well, that's where I'm at. Stay safe, Threadheads, and I hope we can gather soon.

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                        • #27
                          Well, Massachusetts now has the second highest viral transmission rate in the country:

                          https://www.bostonherald.com/2020/09...ighest-in-u-s/

                          Naturally, the Governor decided this is a great time to open indoor music venues:

                          https://www.bostonglobe.com/2020/09/...ng-plan-oct-5/

                          Undoubtedly, this will work out great.

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            We are supposed to get new toys of some kind tomorrow. I think we will catch up to the rest of the state and move to phase 3, though i can't really recall what that is anymore. i think bars will re-open (at least with go cups) and restaurants can be more full. Let you know after the press conference tomorrow.

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                            • #29
                              Bars are re-opened, but for takeout service only.
                              Gotta love this town.
                              Here are the rest of our new rules:
                              https://www.nola.com/news/coronaviru...ce56b5d77.html

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by HankAndLeeStamper View Post
                                Bars are re-opened, but for takeout service only.
                                Gotta love this town.
                                Here are the rest of our new rules:
                                https://www.nola.com/news/coronaviru...ce56b5d77.html
                                Yeah, I heard from my friends at The Abbey. No inside customers until October 31. And no help from Congress for anyone. Good grief.

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