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  • #16
    Originally posted by belyin View Post

    When I first arrived in New Orleans in the fall of 1983 as a callow youth, I answered a want ad in the T-P for a waiter job at Liuzza's (on Bienville.) Being clueless about the physical as well as social geography of New Orleans, I took a bus ride to this unfamiliar territory. The older New Orleans-Italian woman interviewing me informed me they never had a man waiting tables there, implying they weren't about to start, and that she was appalled that I was the sort of person who could even consider living 1,200 miles from my mother! Suitably chastised, I returned to the French Quarter at got a job at the 711 Club on Bourbon St (home of Al Broussard!) where no questions were asked.

    Sadly, the Saturn Bar is being sold. No idea to whom or to become what, but I take this as sad news. First time I went there was to hear Alex Chilton (with the Royal Pendletons opening.) After I moved into the neighborhood in the mid 90's they were only open sporadically, but after O'Neal died and his children (and then grandchildren) took over, they found their groove. Jeff Treffinger (who ran the Truck Farm down the street and previously a partner in the Mermaid Lounge) helped to organize music and a Mermaid/Circle Bar sort of vibe ensued. Truck Farm resident Alex McMurray found a home there for his Valparaiso Men's Chorus and a Thursday night series. The monthly Mod Dance Party was a big hit, and it was the latest home to King James and the Special Men's Monday night gig. And like the Circle Bar and Mermaid Lounge they were also open to more "experimental" scenes: Scatterjazz produced a concert of Jason Marsalis, Steve Masakowski, and German saxophone great Frank Gratkowski. I hosted Rob Wagner's brass quartet with Hamid Drake, Jeff Albert, and Jon Gross. It was a venue for the annual Instigation Festival's musicians from Chicago (including Mars Williams, Mike Reed, and Steve Marquette.) And Jonathan Freilich's Naked Orchestra made regular appearances as well.

    I suspect the new owners will orient the place more toward the emerging neighborhood realities of gentrification and Air B'nB' tourism and away from older grittier and more creative St. Claude/Bywater vibe (kind of like how the Mermaid Lounge became the Rusty Nail,) but I hope I am pleasantly surprised.
    I really dug The Mermaid Lounge. They had a cool vibe, eclectic bookings and super-sexy barmaids. When I first moved here back in the 90s I drove a truck down with all my stuff which I dropped off and kept the truck for a couple of days. I brought my friend to The Mermaid and when we walked in they said "Oh, finally". I was confused and then realized they thought we were the band because of the truck! Haha.

    New Orleans is a city, things change, for the worse and for the better. My favorite was Cafe Brazil, once that was gone and Frenchman blew up I hardly ever went down there unless friends are in town or someone good is playing at Sung.

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    • #17
      I've not been going to Frenchman St. since before most of you were born.

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      • #18
        The Café Brazil vibe is still there ( for now ) with Favela Chic. Same layout and good music. Bummed about Saturn Bar and Liuzza's ( Lil Dizzy's as well ). I still miss the 'Spellcaster Lounge'. The cultural landscape of this city will be much changed when Covid releases us from it's merciless grip. Hopefully we will still be funky. I have a feeling we will.
        Last edited by Marignygregg; 11-24-2020, 02:50 PM.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Marignygregg View Post
          The Café Brazil vibe is still there ( for now ) with Favela Chic. Same layout and good music. Bummed about Saturn Bar and Liuzza's ( Lil Dizzy's as well ). I still miss the 'Spellcaster Lounge'. The cultural landscape of this city will be much changed when Covid releases us from it's merciless grip. Hopefully we will still be funky. I have a feeling we will.
          Even though I only ate there a few times Lil Dizzy's was quintessential New Orleans. Liuzza's, which I live right behind is kind of a relic from the past and not in a good way. Every time I ride by I wonder how they stay open. Way too many other choices here in Mid City.

          I'm glad they opened Favela Chic as that space was closed for years but we'd go to Cafe Brazil to see Galactic, Iris May Tango, Mas Mamones, Iguanas, Klezmer All Stars (with Willie Green) and many others for free or just a few dollars. That owner Ade was kinda crazy. I've got a few stories about him. That was before the explosion of clubs on Frenchman.

          Spellcaster Lounge was definitely a trip and so New Orleans.

          I also really miss the old Dragon's Den. All kinds of great bands used to play there for little to no cover. We used to just go to these clubs without even knowing who was playing, something I rarely do anymore. Different time. But this city will always be funky no doubt!

          Back in the day uptown by The Leaf used to be club central, especially during Jazz Fest. The Maple Leaf, Muddy Waters a block or two away, Jimmy's(where everyone including Nine Inch Nails played) and Carrolton Station all right near each other.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by jjazznj View Post

            Even though I only ate there a few times Lil Dizzy's was quintessential New Orleans. Liuzza's, which I live right behind is kind of a relic from the past and not in a good way. Every time I ride by I wonder how they stay open. Way too many other choices here in Mid City.

            I'm glad they opened Favela Chic as that space was closed for years but we'd go to Cafe Brazil to see Galactic, Iris May Tango, Mas Mamones, Iguanas, Klezmer All Stars (with Willie Green) and many others for free or just a few dollars. That owner Ade was kinda crazy. I've got a few stories about him. That was before the explosion of clubs on Frenchman.

            Spellcaster Lounge was definitely a trip and so New Orleans.

            I also really miss the old Dragon's Den. All kinds of great bands used to play there for little to no cover. We used to just go to these clubs without even knowing who was playing, something I rarely do anymore. Different time. But this city will always be funky no doubt!

            Back in the day uptown by The Leaf used to be club central, especially during Jazz Fest. The Maple Leaf, Muddy Waters a block or two away, Jimmy's(where everyone including Nine Inch Nails played) and Carrolton Station all right near each other.
            95 to 05 really was a great time for live music in New Orleans. Frenchmen was sprouting clubs like mushrooms after the rain and it was still for locals. Rampart Street had it's own little scene with Funky But, Mama's Blues, Donna's, King Bolden's. Uptown still had Muddy Waters, Jimmy's, Carrolton Station, Benny's. Irma's club was still open. And you could still catch Dr. John, Neville Brothers, Meters/Funky Meters, Earl King, Pete Fountain. Eddie Bo, Fats Domino, Radiators, Uptown Allstars, Snooks and So many more, most still in their prime.

            Now we have the Revivalists......sigh. Glad Galactic is still making the rounds.

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            • #21
              No! Lil Dizzy's has closed?! This is the first i heard about it. We ate there on almost every NOLA trip. Now I'm very sad. And hungry.

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              • #22
                Originally posted by The Krewe of Chew View Post
                No! Lil Dizzy's has closed?! This is the first i heard about it. We ate there on almost every NOLA trip. Now I'm very sad. And hungry.
                Yup. And for lovers of Rock and Roll ( like us ) the loss of Circle Bar, GasaGasa and Saturn Bar is a big blow. There wasn't a lot of clubs left to see ( or play....) Rock and Roll pre Covid and now even less.

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                • #23
                  In an interview Tuesday, proprietors Lori and Frank Bordelon said they are selling the restaurant to retire. At 61 and 73, respectively, they feel the time is right to pass the business on to a new owner and begin a new chapter of life with more time for family.

                  “It’s been a lot of fun, the restaurant has kept life very interesting, but it’s time to move on,” Frank Bordelon said.

                  They confirmed that the restaurant will remain open for business as usual while they own it, at least under the terms of whatever coronavirus restrictions are in effect. They hope a future buyer will keep the restaurant open as Liuzza's and maintain its traditions.

                  “I feel strongly that Liuzza’s will be around for many years to come,” said Lori Bordelon.
                  ...
                  The Bordelons know some think the sale is a response to the pandemic. But they say their plans to sell pre-date the crisis.

                  “What COVID did was actually delay those plans,” Lori Bordelon said.
                  https://www.nola.com/entertainment_l...ee8e5c0ed.html
                  Visit my Jazzfest advice site: http://jazzfest.swagland.com/

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by jjazznj View Post



                    I'm glad they opened Favela Chic as that space was closed for years but we'd go to Cafe Brazil to see Galactic, Iris May Tango, Mas Mamones, Iguanas, Klezmer All Stars (with Willie Green) and many others for free or just a few dollars. That owner Ade was kinda crazy. I've got a few stories about him. That was before the explosion of clubs on Frenchman.
                    Two weeks ago on cool afternoon I was walking up Frenchmen St. and I ran into Ade outside of the little market. And then I saw Jason (Snug Harbor,) Michael (Bicycle Michael's,) and Jason Snug Harbor all hanging in front of d.b.a. All that was missing was the DeSoto and a whole host of musicians both living and passed on . . .

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                    • #25
                      Originally posted by The Krewe of Chew View Post
                      No! Lil Dizzy's has closed?! This is the first i heard about it. We ate there on almost every NOLA trip. Now I'm very sad. And hungry.
                      https://www.nola.com/entertainment_l...27e05378b.html

                      I'd heard the NY Times editor's name but didn't make the connection before:

                      Since the days of Eddie’s, which closed in 1996, [Wayne Baquet's] family has branched into other fields (his brother Dean Baquet, for one, is executive editor of the New York Times). Baquet's own children have similarly pursued careers outside the restaurant world (full disclosure: his son Wayne Baquet Jr. is CEO of Imperial Trading, the grocery distributor owned by John Georges, who also owns The Times-Picayune | The New Orleans Advocate).

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                      • #26
                        Wow, great piece of trivia I never knew. I can't wait to share this at Jazz Fest the next time I'm having Trout Baquet.

                        Oh, wait....[sniff]...

                        "Leading in the polls at the time, Edwards looked unbeatable on his way to a third of four stints as Louisiana's governor. So [Dean] Baquet asked him the obvious question and came away with one of the most famous quotes in modern American politics.

                        "The only way I could lose this election," Edwards said, "is if I'm caught in bed with a dead girl or a live boy."

                        It would take Baquet three days to get that line past The Times-Picayune's squeamish copy desk..."

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Headless Hornman View Post

                          "Leading in the polls at the time, Edwards looked unbeatable on his way to a third of four stints as Louisiana's governor. So [Dean] Baquet asked him the obvious question and came away with one of the most famous quotes in modern American politics.

                          "The only way I could lose this election," Edwards said, "is if I'm caught in bed with a dead girl or a live boy."

                          It would take Baquet three days to get that line past The Times-Picayune's squeamish copy desk..."
                          In Edwards great return (the election against Klansman Grand Poobah David Duke,) he was asked if he had anything in common with Duke. Edwards replied "Well, we are both known to be wizards on the sheets."

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