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Happy Mardi Gras 2021 !!

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  • Happy Mardi Gras 2021 !!

    From balmy New Orleans !! Started pounding beer at 10 am. It is Mardi Gras, after all.

  • #2
    Next thing we will hear is that you're down in the French Quarter......pissing La Toya off.

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    • #3
      Happy Mardi Gras from freezing New Orleans.

      Here's Shotgun House's Mardi Gras song. My buddy Frankie wrote it because of his experience marching with the Lyons Club who traditionally walk ahead of the Rex Parade. Not this year...

      https://youtu.be/QDxuBp0eXPU
      Last edited by chopitulas; 2 weeks ago.

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      • #4
        Mardi Gras in Chicago entailed shoveling the new 8" of powder snow we got overnight ( some areas in Chicagaland got 17+ " depending on where the northerly lake-effect plume strayed; we now have as much as 2 feet on the ground), watching the videos of collapsed building roofs on the news, and some yummy homemade chicken, andouille, and shrimp gumbo for dinner. And paczki! How's about some parades in October too?
        Last edited by fesstgeek; 2 weeks ago. Reason: spelling

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        • #5
          The view down the block. More tomorrow, whee!
          It'll be 10 consecutive days with measurable snowfall, a new Chicago record. C'mon October....

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          • #6
            Originally posted by fesstgeek View Post
            And paczki!
            Smacnego!

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            • #7
              Had a great Fat Tuesday !! Our friends/neighbors invited us over and we drank and ate to our hearts and bellies content. Went to the Quarter for a bit. Nuthin like usual, but still some folks out with costumes and merriment. Watched the 'Meeting of the Courts' rerun from last year and passed out.

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              • #8
                All things considered, we had an adequate Mardi Gras Day. Starting the morning with Irish Cream in the coffee, then a bloody Mary, then a bottle of champagne. Drove around and looked at House Floats and saw a few Mardi Gras Indians. The Indian display at Canal and Norman C Francis Pkwy (nee Robert E Lee) was incredible - will try to post a link. Rode the bikes around the French Quarter and along the river for about an hour in the afternoon. Spent the evening tucked on the couch, wrapped in a blanket, watching Jon Cleary and Ivan Neville do their show from Esplanade Studios. I was in bed by 10.

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                • #9
                  https://www.nola.com/entertainment_l...ec37337f7.html

                  Canal Street commuters’ heads swiveled on Mardi Gras morning at the sight of a magnificent Mardi Gras Indian suit standing on the spot once occupied by a bronze statue dedicated to Jefferson Davis, the leader of the Confederacy.

                  The feathered and beaded suit, which is encased in a protective plastic box, stands about nine feet tall.

                  Fat Tuesday morning, the climax of Carnival, is the traditional moment when Mardi Gras Indians, also referred to as Black Masking Indians, emerge onto the streets to reveal their elaborate and laboriously-made suits. The unique custom combines African, Native American and other cultural influences. This year, the tradition was mostly curtailed by the pandemic and plummeting temperatures.

                  But Demond Melancon, Big Chief of the Young Seminole Hunter tribe, conceived a way to honor tradition without much COVID-19 risk. Melancon said it was dream of his to see a statue of a masker where Davis once stood. So, in the wee hours of frosty Tuesday morning, with the help of what he called “some fairy angels,” he placed a suit where he thought it belonged.

                  Asked if he sought permission in advance, Melancon said, "No, I just did it."

                  “I’m a Big Chief, so I do what I want,” he added, laughing.

                  Placing a suit in a resonant spot was particularly important this year, he said, because New Orleans culture bearers have been hard hit by COVID-19 both health-wise and economically. It’s been a year when “everybody lost everything,” he said.

                  The small posters reading “The People Are King” that were scattered at the base of the suit, were meant to symbolize the importance of these individuals, he said.

                  Melancon said the exhibition of the statute is meant to be in keeping with City Hall’s efforts to produce a safe Carnival.

                  “This is a way of me showing we can stand in solidarity with the mayor,” he said. “We hope everybody sticks to the

                  guidelines."

                  The monument to Davis was erected in 1903, during the Jim Crow era and removed in 2017, with a handful of other Confederate tributes.

                  Melancon said that he created the suit for the 2020 season. It’s titled “Jah Defender” and the bead mosaics include an image Haile Selassie, who is revered among some Rastafarians.

                  The suit is located at the intersection of Canal Street and Norman C. Francis Parkway, which had, until recently, been named Jeff Davis Parkway. The monument to Davis was erected in 1903, during the Jim Crow era and removed in 2017, with a handful of other Confederate tributes.






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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by festbabe View Post
                    https://www.nola.com/entertainment_l...ec37337f7.html

                    Canal Street commuters’ heads swiveled on Mardi Gras morning at the sight of a magnificent Mardi Gras Indian suit standing on the spot once occupied by a bronze statue dedicated to Jefferson Davis, the leader of the Confederacy.

                    The feathered and beaded suit, which is encased in a protective plastic box, stands about nine feet tall.

                    Fat Tuesday morning, the climax of Carnival, is the traditional moment when Mardi Gras Indians, also referred to as Black Masking Indians, emerge onto the streets to reveal their elaborate and laboriously-made suits. The unique custom combines African, Native American and other cultural influences. This year, the tradition was mostly curtailed by the pandemic and plummeting temperatures.

                    But Demond Melancon, Big Chief of the Young Seminole Hunter tribe, conceived a way to honor tradition without much COVID-19 risk. Melancon said it was dream of his to see a statue of a masker where Davis once stood. So, in the wee hours of frosty Tuesday morning, with the help of what he called “some fairy angels,” he placed a suit where he thought it belonged.

                    Asked if he sought permission in advance, Melancon said, "No, I just did it."

                    “I’m a Big Chief, so I do what I want,” he added, laughing.

                    Placing a suit in a resonant spot was particularly important this year, he said, because New Orleans culture bearers have been hard hit by COVID-19 both health-wise and economically. It’s been a year when “everybody lost everything,” he said.

                    The small posters reading “The People Are King” that were scattered at the base of the suit, were meant to symbolize the importance of these individuals, he said.

                    Melancon said the exhibition of the statute is meant to be in keeping with City Hall’s efforts to produce a safe Carnival.

                    “This is a way of me showing we can stand in solidarity with the mayor,” he said. “We hope everybody sticks to the

                    guidelines."

                    The monument to Davis was erected in 1903, during the Jim Crow era and removed in 2017, with a handful of other Confederate tributes.

                    Melancon said that he created the suit for the 2020 season. It’s titled “Jah Defender” and the bead mosaics include an image Haile Selassie, who is revered among some Rastafarians.

                    The suit is located at the intersection of Canal Street and Norman C. Francis Parkway, which had, until recently, been named Jeff Davis Parkway. The monument to Davis was erected in 1903, during the Jim Crow era and removed in 2017, with a handful of other Confederate tributes.
                    I love this. Thanks for posting, FB.

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