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  • Beginnings by CTA

    I was listening to the first album by Chicago Transit Authority, later known as Chicago, using my new headphones. If you listening intently to the last few seconds of the song Beginnings you can hear them singing 'My grandma and your grandma were sitting by the fire' over the percussion.

  • #2
    Originally posted by ice nine View Post
    I was listening to the first album by Chicago Transit Authority, later known as Chicago, using my new headphones. If you listening intently to the last few seconds of the song Beginnings you can hear them singing 'My grandma and your grandma were sitting by the fire' over the percussion.
    Never noticed that. My high school buddies did the light show at Fillmore West the weekend of Woodstock with CTA headlining over The Youngbloods and the English jazz/rock group Colisseum. What a night! CTA was phenomenal doing that 1st album. Their tightness and musicianship was a revelation compared to the looser approach of the SF bands at the time.

    I have also heard that CTA took that gig over an offer to play Woodstock figuring headlining Fillmore West was more important.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by ice nine View Post
      I was listening to the first album by Chicago Transit Authority, later known as Chicago, using my new headphones. If you listening intently to the last few seconds of the song Beginnings you can hear them singing 'My grandma and your grandma were sitting by the fire' over the percussion.
      That is a great album. Has withstood the test of time. At least to my ears.

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      • #4
        That Kath guy was a remarkably good guitarist, a great combination of technique and imagination. After his death, the recipe for Chicago was never the same. Aren't they up to Chicago MMXVI by now?

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        • #5
          I had all the Chicago albums back in the day as my mother who thought "Rock and Roll was the Devil's Diversion" (based on a book of that name) didn't seem to mind them. Donated all my vinyl a few years back...someone somewhere surely must be enjoying them now.

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          • #6
            I was 11 years old when Chicago IX, Chicago’s Greatest Hits, was released. From the Boston suburb of Newton, I rode the Green Line into Boston and then the Red Line to Harvard Square, Cambridge — at that time the coolest place on the face of the earth to an 11-year-old — just to buy the album at the Harvard Coop, one of the world’s great record stores. (I could have bought it at my local record store, but that would have cost me $4.99, whereas I got it at the Coop for $3.99, plus 20 round-trip subway fare.) Over the next couple of years, I would add all of Chicago’s albums that preceded Chicago IX to my collection. I still have them all. I think.

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            • #7
              I use to live by one of the Green Lines. I didn't go to school in Boston, but I enjoyed hanging out in Harvard Square and walking up and down Newbury St.

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              • #8
                Originally posted by chopitulas View Post

                Never noticed that. My high school buddies did the light show at Fillmore West the weekend of Woodstock with CTA headlining over The Youngbloods and the English jazz/rock group Colisseum. What a night! CTA was phenomenal doing that 1st album. Their tightness and musicianship was a revelation compared to the looser approach of the SF bands at the time.

                I have also heard that CTA took that gig over an offer to play Woodstock figuring headlining Fillmore West was more important.
                Someone told me that CTA had a contract with Bill Graham that allowed him to move their dates around and that he moved them to the Woodstock weekend to free up Santana. Hadn't heard that part of the story, if true. Didn't really hurt Chicago to not be at Woodstock, I suppose, given their success.

                I did go on the Sunday night of the aforementioned weekend and Bill came out on stage to proudly say he had just returned from Woodstock where Santana had been introduced to the world, that being his price to help the promoters. That is the way I had always heard it, minus the moving of CTA's gig with him.
                Last edited by chopitulas; 2 weeks ago.

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                • #9
                  Chicago was my first 'rock' concert in 8th grade just as Chicago III came out. My buddy's music teacher dad took us. I had worn out the first 2 records at that point. The sound of Kath's guitar over those horns just blew me away. Chicago V was OK but I lost interest after that. BS&T 2&3 were also heavily played.
                  Growing up with that certainly made New Orleans sound sweet to my ears once I got to hear it later on.

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                  • #10
                    That doc that came out in '19 was really good if you are a fan. I'm not much of a fan but really enjoyed it.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by larrybalmur View Post
                      Chicago was my first 'rock' concert in 8th grade just as Chicago III came out. My buddy's music teacher dad took us. I had worn out the first 2 records at that point. The sound of Kath's guitar over those horns just blew me away. Chicago V was OK but I lost interest after that. BS&T 2&3 were also heavily played.
                      Growing up with that certainly made New Orleans sound sweet to my ears once I got to hear it later on.
                      My first 'real' concert as well. 1976 ( or 77 ? ). Chicago Stadium. Last tour with Terry Kath and right after Greatest Hits came out. 'If you Leave Me Now' was all over the radio at the time. Definitely a transitional song !! Good show, but my second 'real' concert was much better. Queen with Freddie. Chicago Stadium, 1977 !! My Mom also turned me onto Chicago. She had all the early albums and cranked em in the morning, after we got out of bed. She turned me onto the Moody Blues as well !! Thank's Mom !!

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                      • #12
                        Chicago was my second "real" rock concert. Them plus the Doobie Brothers in 1974 at Roosevelt Stadium in NJ. I was impressed by the revolving stage I loved horn-backed bands in my youth. Chicago at Carnegie Hall was my jam!!!

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Marignygregg View Post

                          My first 'real' concert as well. 1976 ( or 77 ? ). Chicago Stadium. Last tour with Terry Kath and right after Greatest Hits came out. 'If you Leave Me Now' was all over the radio at the time. Definitely a transitional song !! Good show, but my second 'real' concert was much better. Queen with Freddie. Chicago Stadium, 1977 !! My Mom also turned me onto Chicago. She had all the early albums and cranked em in the morning, after we got out of bed. She turned me onto the Moody Blues as well !! Thank's Mom !!
                          I saw that show, too, at the old Boston Garden. My first concert was Melissa Manchester and Tavares at Boston’s Symphony Hall. This was my second.

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